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Re: GIS Data

From: Gannon Dick <gannon_dick@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2011 17:08:15 -0700 (PDT)
Message-ID: <1315872495.80885.YahooMailClassic@web112614.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>
To: Chris Beer <chris@codex.net.au>, Andrew Boyd <facibus@gmail.com>
Cc: public-egov-ig@w3.org, briangryth@gmail.com
Sadly, we'll be talking about this for quite a while, in the US at least[1].  It's just a matter of a few feet, but it certainly can render State and Federal Jurisdictions less certain.  c.f. coastline graph at bottom.

--Gannon

[1] http://www.nauticalcharts.noaa.gov/csdl/mbound.htm
--- On Mon, 9/12/11, Andrew Boyd <facibus@gmail.com> wrote:

> From: Andrew Boyd <facibus@gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: GIS Data
> To: "Chris Beer" <chris@codex.net.au>
> Cc: public-egov-ig@w3.org, briangryth@gmail.com
> Date: Monday, September 12, 2011, 6:26 PM
> On Tue, Sep 13, 2011 at 6:18 AM,
> Chris Beer <chris@codex.net.au>
> wrote:
> > Hi Brian
> > All Federal level Govt GIS which is publically
> released in Australia is done
> > so under Creative Commons (CC-by) and is treated as
> Open PSI. In the same
> > vein I suspect you may find there are US jurisdictions
> which may have moved
> > to CC and just bundle datasets inc GIS into the PSI CC
> licensed space.
> > Certain jusrisdictions in Australia (Brisbane City
> Council for instance)
> > release thier GIS under CC-0 - that is Public Domain,
> no restrictions at
> > all.
> > GIS Web Services often are an overlooked area here -
> its not seen as
> > released or published in the classic sense, and
> service usage rights are
> > often very liberal.
> > A US example of GIS btw is PASDA in Penn. http://www.pasda.psu.edu/about/
> > Cheers
> > C.
> 
> Chris,
> 
> interesting point - there is release of data, then there is
> release of
> data in a consumable form. I recently completed some work
> with an AU
> government organisation that has a lot to do with providing
> GIS data
> to industry and interested citizens. Consumers of the data
> fell into
> three fairly distinct types:
> - large organisations that just wanted the data that they
> wanted, and
> as much of it as they could get - based on the
> understanding that they
> had the resources necessary to manipulate the data in
> whichever way
> necessary
> - smaller organisations that wanted value-adds wherever
> possible to
> minimise the required legwork needed prior to consuming the
> data
> - others (including private citizens) who did not really
> want data,
> but the answers that the data could provide them, and for
> whom the raw
> data was pretty much useless.
> 
> The organisation may be looking toward a future where they
> have a
> smart catalog for those in the first category, a referral
> system for
> assistance for those in the second category, and a lower
> barrier to
> entry geoportal for those in the third category.
> 
> If I get back there to assist with follow-on work I will
> happily
> assist with the case study.
> 
> Best regards, Andrew
> 
> -- 
> ---
> Andrew Boyd
> http://uxbookclub.org -- connect, read, discuss
> 
> 
Received on Tuesday, 13 September 2011 00:08:44 GMT

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