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Re: More Talk of a Federalized Web

From: Mike Norton <xsideofparadise@yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Nov 2010 11:03:24 -0700 (PDT)
Message-ID: <659686.36772.qm@web82403.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
To: Chris Beer <chris@e-beer.net.au>
Cc: Gannon Dick <gannon_dick@yahoo.com>, Submit to W3C Egov IG <public-egov-ig@w3.org>
Yes I think judicious use of ".info" in your example would put the idea on its 
path to development.  Even better yet a TLD for managing repositories of public 
data could be established, like a ".pub" or something, should Afilias want to 
keep ".info" as it is.   The federal agencies I have in mind 
wouldn't achieve the amount of autonomy I originally conceived on this path, but 
I think the service would achieve just as much functionality.  Browsers could be 
"taught" to pull user-defined data, when traversing www.company.com, and display 
such data acquired from securities.company.pub and environment.company.pub or 
law.company.pub, where datasets representative of open public data are kept and 
managed. 

Another suggestion I have received from multiple sources would be, in line with 
your suggestion Chris, to have company.fcc.gov and company.epa.gov and 
company.doj.gov, etc., but I think that would put too much weight upon that 
agency's website--a separate repository represented on the DNS level would 
suffice.  

As for political turbulence undergoing its development, it would probably have 
to developed by an independent agency in line with the judicial branch of 
government here in the States, with independence from elected administrations 
incoming and outgoing, if it were to exist at all.  Something the Supreme Court 
could establish, perhaps?  :)
 
Michael A. Norton
 




________________________________
From: Chris Beer <chris@e-beer.net.au>
To: Mike Norton <xsideofparadise@yahoo.com>
Cc: Gannon Dick <gannon_dick@yahoo.com>; Submit to W3C Egov IG 
<public-egov-ig@w3.org>
Sent: Fri, November 5, 2010 9:56:06 PM
Subject: Re: More Talk of a a Federalized Web


Isn't that the domain of metadata standards (I believe the TAG is looking at 
this ATM) and subsequent integration into the semweb? Relying on DNS to handle 
that sort of thing lends itself to error the second your host, or your data, is 
offshore. You are also putting an undue expectation on TLD administrators to 
work closely with work with every state in the world in registering each and 
every entity in an administration as a TLD. And you also need to account for MoG 
(machinery of government) changes - what happens when a new administration comes 
in and splits a department in two?

Don't get me wrong - I'm not saying yours is a bad idea - just that there is a 
lot to think about in realizing it as a reality.

Prehaps judicious use of the .info domain could be an option? 


A change of business rules could see .info used in a true information sense, 
reserved for gov or authority (or encyclopedic) use. epa.company.info would make 
semantic sense for carbon footprint on a company, just as 
securities.company.info would make sense for corporate registry info.

cheers

Chris Beer (iPhone)
On 06/11/2010, at 11:50, Mike Norton <xsideofparadise@yahoo.com> wrote:


The thing about Vocabulary Encoding Schemes, it seems to me, is that each 
governing agency, whether EPA of Health & Human Services or NASA, has its own 
Scheme, its own vocabulary; to streamline them in a way that allows for data to 
flow freely within its own unique DNS will enable a much larger, much richer 
picture of governance at work.  The "clouds" of information to emerge from such 
a configuration are unimaginable.
> 
>Michael A. Norton
> 
>
>
>
>
>
________________________________
From: Gannon Dick <gannon_dick@yahoo.com>
>To: Chris Beer <chris@e-beer.net.au>; Mike Norton <xsideofparadise@yahoo.com>
>Cc: Submit to W3C Egov IG <public-egov-ig@w3.org>
>Sent: Fri, November 5, 2010 4:46:54 PM
>Subject: Re: More Talk of a a Federalized Web
>
>
>Chris has a point.  There are great, no merely good security advantages to using 
>ccTLD's tied to jurisdiction.  But then, the combination of managers who saw 
>cost efficiencies where there were none (I saved three characters.  NOW it's 
>ready to release!) and people who named their programs "grep" (I was told by a 
>PhD in Computer Science in 2007 that quoting attributes was make work.)  took 
>it's inevitable toll.  Pick your favorite commercial URL and add .us to it and 
>you'll find it doesn't work.  Pick a crook's URL and add .us to it and ... never 
>mind you already did that.
>
>I'm not totally unsympathetic though Mike.  When I talk about "Federalization" 
>I'm talking about doing away with the need for ad hoc Vocabulary Encoding 
>Schemes which do not translate - they are symbols for symbols.  The question for 
>me is:  what  rock is that domain tied to.  Inside the Law and Outside the Law 
>is a binary choice.
>
>--- On Fri, 11/5/10, Mike Norton <xsideofparadise@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>
>>From: Mike Norton <xsideofparadise@yahoo.com>
>>Subject: Re: More Talk of a a Federalized Web
>>To: "Chris Beer" <chris@e-beer.net.au>
>>Cc: "Gannon Dick" <gannon_dick@yahoo.com>, "Submit to W3C Egov IG" 
>><public-egov-ig@w3.org>
>>Date: Friday, November 5, 2010, 4:01 PM
>>
>>
>>Good point, Chris.  But just because the web is an international machine of 
>>mystery doesn't negate the benefits of having a google.nasa site AND a 
>>google.esa site (the latter the Euro Space Agency) - there would be a plethora 
>>of new TLD's in this scenario - in the hundreds...and all for great measure!
>> 
>>IMO :o)
>> 
>>Michael A. Norton
>> 
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
________________________________
 From: Chris Beer <chris@e-beer.net.au>
>>To: Mike Norton <xsideofparadise@yahoo.com>
>>Cc: Gannon Dick <gannon_dick@yahoo.com>; Submit to W3C Egov IG 
>><public-egov-ig@w3.org>
>>Sent: Fri, November 5, 2010 1:46:35 PM
>>Subject: Re: More Talk of a a Federalized Web
>>
>>
>>Federalised would be nice, except the web is international. A better start would 
>>be forcing the use of .us for ALL US domains to level the playing field to the 
>>standard as written.
>>
>>
>>IMO :)
>>
>>Chris Beer (iPhone)
>>
>>On 06/11/2010, at 3:56, Mike Norton <xsideofparadise@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>On a federalized web, I could go to sirius.fcc, bp.epa, caltech.hhs, 
>>microsoft.law, and laidlaw.sec and check, respectively, this company's spectrum 
>>purchasing history, that company's conservation efforts, this school's medical 
>>record activity, that company's volume of legal data, and this company's public 
>>financial statements, and vice versa, while each company's marketing efforts I 
>>don't have to worry about, because I'm not at .com, I'm on the federal web! 
>>> 
>>>Michael A. Norton
>>>  
>>>
>>>
>>>
________________________________
 From: Gannon Dick <gannon_dick@yahoo.com>
>>>To: Mike Norton <xsideofparadise@yahoo.com>
>>>Sent: Wed, November 3, 2010 5:33:47 PM
>>>Subject: Re: What if ... A Federalized Web
>>>
>>>
>>>Outside the US, nobody knows what "FCC" means though ...
>>>
>>>Wouldn't that be a problem ?  It would be nice to have a purl.org/usa/gov/xxx 
>>>forwarding service though.  
>>>
>>>
>>>--- On Wed, 11/3/10, Mike Norton <xsideofparadise@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>From: Mike Norton <xsideofparadise@yahoo.com>
>>>>Subject: Re: What if ... A Federalized Web
>>>>To: "Gannon Dick" <gannon_dick@yahoo.com>
>>>>Date: Wednesday, November 3, 2010, 7:21 PM
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 
>>>>operative word is "front man" - it would be interesting to be able to to 
>>>>traverse URLs such as google.fcc, nbc.fcc, yahoo.fcc, fox.fcc, etc. while doing 
>>>>the great service that FCC is supposed to provide.   SEO mavericks such as 
>>>>Google itself could then genrate such lists as "Top 10 Most Active FCC 
>>>>Companies" and likewise "Top 10 Most FCC Fined Companies" and Top 100's, etc.
>>>> 
>>>>Michael A. Norton
>>>>  
>>>
>>>
>>>
>> 
>
>


      
Received on Saturday, 6 November 2010 18:03:59 GMT

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