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Re: mapping "open government" and "freedom of information" initiatives timeline

From: Daniel Dietrich <daniel@so36.net>
Date: Sat, 8 May 2010 12:56:16 +0200
Cc: "'IG eGovIG'" <public-egov-ig@w3.org>
Message-Id: <C7875EF6-981D-431B-A279-8C9E9842950B@so36.net>
To: J.H. Snider <snider@isolon.org>
Dear Jim, and others


thank you very much for your response. I think you are right an I propably missed to explain who I am and what I am looking for.

My Name is Daniel Dietrich, I am a researcher at Technical University Berlin, Informatics and Society, I am also the chairman of a german based non-profit called the Open Data Network, focussing to promote open government, open data and transparency here in Germany. 

I am also involved in a report with the Open Knoledge Foundation (okfn) on open governmnt and freedom of information initiatives. This report is not a scientific work but rather a general overview. So the timeline is supplementary work for the report. More information is available at:  http://opengovernmentdata.org/

The focus of this research is to map 'open government data' initiatives, i.e. where there is explicit provision regarding *reuse* of public information, on a timeline. In particular government information that is "open" as in opendefinition.org.
  
Kind regards
Daniel



On 07.05.2010, at 19:57, J.H. Snider wrote:

> Hi Daniel,
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> I would encourage you to create three separate timelines: one each for the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.  In any case, I would encourage you to clarify that what you mean below by an "open government" timeline is in fact an executive branch open government timeline.



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> You might also want to clarify what constitutes an innovation worthy of including on this timeline.  Currently, the timeline covers a mix of government and advocacy organizations.  My impression is that you’ve defined innovation in political rather than intellectual or public policy terms.  This, of course, is exactly how political actors, their funders, and the press usually define innovation. 
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> Take Ralph Nader’s Congressional Accountability Project from the mid-1990s (it was most active from about 1995-2000).  Many if not most of the Sunlight Foundation’s “innovations” can be traced back to the Congressional Accountability Project.  The Congressonal Accountability Project is no longer politically relevant and therefore has been all but forgotten.  If you were doing an academic study of open government political innovation, you’d probably have to give the Congressional Accountability Project at least a footnote.  But if, on the advocacy side, you are only interested in current politically relevant innovators, then you wouldn’t want to include the Congressional Accountability Project.  The key point--in the spirit of transparencyJ--is to let your readers know what type of political innovation you are trying to capture on your timeline.
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> Thanks for putting together this useful timeline.
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> --Jim
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> J.H. Snider, Ph.D.
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> President
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> iSolon.org
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> Web: www.isolon.org
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> -----Original Message-----
> From: public-egov-ig-request@w3.org [mailto:public-egov-ig-request@w3.org] On Behalf Of Daniel Dietrich
> Sent: Friday, May 07, 2010 11:31 AM
> To: IG eGovIG
> Subject: mapping "open government" and "freedom of information" initiatives timeline
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> Dear all,
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> I am actually working on a research to map "open government" and "freedom of information" initiatives around the world.
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> One part will be a timeline to illustrate the most important / outstanding issues and events on both government policy / legislation as well as civil society initiatives
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> I would like to invite you to have a look on the timeline we have drafted
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> http://docs.google.com/document/edit?id=19V5UTfrbw1fvBw1FjUJtmgJj9i6eG8nZTh6KoTDVlY0#
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> and possibly add things we might have missed. Especially initiatives, projects, government policy and or law in your countries would be a substantial benefit to help us complete the picture. It should not take you longer than 10 minutes. If you don't feel comfortable editing the google doc you could also send me a mail. Tanks in advance for you kind cooperation.
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> Best regards
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> Daniel
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Received on Saturday, 8 May 2010 10:56:54 GMT

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