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Re: EU/IE Update

From: Gannon Dick <gannon_dick@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2010 14:13:48 -0800 (PST)
Message-ID: <127946.96155.qm@web112609.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>
To: "W3C eGov Interest Group \(All\)" <public-egov-ig@w3.org>
Thanks Bernadette.

In particular, I liked the "Community" work:
http://www.data.gov/community

This work is identical to what I am doing with "Spookville" (except for the fact that Spookville is Text (links) rather than graphical.  There are some issues that do not arise in a graphical environment ... 

1. Each map is 24 hours "wide" and 24 hours "tall" in a semantic sense.  24 Hours "wide" because the biggest map is the whole earth, and 24 Hours "tall" because it is a square projection of a sphere.  Once said, it's obvious, but (vertical) Click Search is fundamentally different from a "Zoom" of a GIS System, which does not exclude regions.

2. All (graphical) maps have a barycenter, which you cannot stop people from misinterpreting.  Furthermore, photographs have a barycenter which, more likely than not, point to something other than Government Property. TV used to use "live" phone numbers in Drama.  Some viewer invariably called the number (at 2 am) to talk about the script leaving the phone number holder very unamused.  A Click Search avoids this problem, but a GIS System cannot.

3. A mouse-over on the map yields the region label.  This is a really good start, but the text link gives the opportunity to add details about the governance of the region ... and to limit the scope of disclosure.  The link out to US State sites, for example, changes the Domain.  This is an American-ism which can easily confuse others.  It should be made clear that there is just one (Government) Domain handing the user off to another trusted member of the "same" Domain.  I call this a manifestation of "Computational Federalism".  It is a creature born of IT pointers and the Vocabulary Encoding Schemes in use long before the web.  To click a link, you need not know the magic words, nor should you. I used the backward looking <pii:misc xmlns:pii="http://purl.org/pii/terms" /> to indicate that (so far) you *were* at trusted Government Domains (pii:misc = !(PII)).

4. There are only two rules for "Computational Federalism" ... 1) there must be at least one complete grouping (Quebec has separate French and English Counties, but both are "Quebec"). 2) If you are not listing a complete group you have to say so (There are 254 Counties in Texas, only 5 are In and Around (iaa) Fort Worth and on the local GIS System AND US-GNIS list).

5. For trade goods you normally need to know both an Origin and a Destination.  They are the same map.  Again, obvious, but when US Customs is unable track Commercial Shipments from address to address, or TSA Agents are overly friendly with pat downs, it's the trusted Domain problem mentioned in #3.

I posted the Ireland example last week.  I have several similar examples, IANA Root Zone, US Counties by State, iaa Fort Worth, etc.  Some are quite large files (for HTML), but they are intended to be filtered.  They all "work" the same way, an XML Data Base, A XSL Display and an HTML Reference.

--Gannon 

--- On Fri, 12/3/10, Bernadette Hyland <bhylandwood@mac.com> wrote:

> From: Bernadette Hyland <bhylandwood@mac.com>
> Subject: Re: EU/IE Update
> To: "Gannon Dick" <gannon_dick@yahoo.com>
> Cc: chris-beer@grapevine.net.au, "W3C eGov Interest Group (All)" <public-egov-ig@w3.org>
> Date: Friday, December 3, 2010, 9:39 PM
> Hi Gannon,
> Apologies for late response ... this was caught in my
> drafts folder ...
> 
> Check out Anne Fitzgerald's talk she gave at the Open
> Government Conference in DC this month.  She is an
> expert on government content (Crown & US copyright) and
> is an invaluable resource.  Most of the presentations
> were posted on the data.gov/conference website. 
> 
> Of course, anytime we can recommend Creative Commons CC
> by-SA is great but getting the policy statements clearly
> identified with the data sets would be a great first
> step.  Step by step, we'll get there.
> 
> Cheers,
> Bernadette Hyland
> 
> 
> On Nov 21, 2010, at 10:41 AM, Gannon Dick wrote:
> 
> > As I have no standing with any Governments, (not to
> say I'm not taxed by mine), I think you are right Chris
> [1].
> > 
> > If I had a wish, it would be a clear statement from
> Governments that first, their output is Public Domain [2],
> and further, that the information is a uniquely true copy,
> meaning Authorized in the sense of Copyright. That
> Governments should not play favorites in the Private Sector
> is clear.  But, that "system" can be gamed if the
> volume of data output exceeds the common citizens' ability
> to consume the data.  A toll booth or a silo are not
> differently bad for the web.  I think there is a
> general problem that the Law governing a toll booth
> (governed by Copyright Law) and a silo (governed by UNCLOS
> [3]) is bound to have a few weak spots.  But I also
> think the problem needs to be bound together and confronted,
> not resolved in detail by a priesthood of specialists.
> > 
> > --Gannon 
> > 
> > [1] http://creativecommons.org/about/licenses/
> > [2] http://creativecommons.org/choose/mark/
> > [3] http://www.un.org/Depts/los/
> > 
> > --- On Sat, 11/20/10, Chris Beer <chris-beer@grapevine.net.au>
> wrote:
> > 
> >> From: Chris Beer <chris-beer@grapevine.net.au>
> >> Subject: Re: EU/IE Update
> >> To: "Gannon Dick" <gannon_dick@yahoo.com>
> >> Cc: "W3C eGov Interest Group (All)" <public-egov-ig@w3.org>
> >> Date: Saturday, November 20, 2010, 8:52 PM
> >> 2) Creative Commons cc by-sa?
> >> 
> >> On 11/21/2010 6:07 AM, Gannon Dick wrote:
> >>> I updated the XML data bases at<http://www.rustprivacy.org/sun/spookville/shp/> 
> >> to include
> >>> 
> >>> * [European Union Trade and Administration]
> XML
> >> (Federated by Host Country)
> >>> nb. EU Agencies and principal institutions are
> spread
> >> out
> >>> 
> >>> * [Ireland] XML (Federated by Statistical
> Reporting
> >> Area)
> >>> nb. Apologies to the Border Region.  I
> used Sligo
> >> for the "Capital" since a triangulation was not in
> the
> >> Republic of Ireland and would be very
> confusing.  This
> >> is exactly why such maps are useful, IMHO.
> >>> 
> >>> 1. I may have to start referring to these as
> 0.01 Star
> >> Maps (see Linked Data App Challenge Task Force
> Meeting
> >> below).  They are intended as a bridge
> between
> >> clickable maps and text.
> >>> 
> >>> 2. They carry a "found it on the street"
> >> license.  Surely DERI or the W3C have a
> better idea.
> >>> 
> >>> --Gannon
> >>> 
> >>> 
> >>> --- On Fri, 11/19/10, Sandro Hawke<sandro@w3.org> 
> >> wrote:
> >>> 
> >>>> From: Sandro Hawke<sandro@w3.org>
> >>>> Subject: minutes of Linked Data App
> Challenge Task
> >> Force Meeting
> >>>> To: "W3C eGov Interest Group (All)"<public-egov-ig@w3.org>
> >>>> Date: Friday, November 19, 2010, 8:08 AM
> >>>> It was mostly me and Michael
> >>>> Hausenblas catching up on the state of
> the
> >>>> linked data world, but there was some
> scribed
> >> business:
> >>>> 
> >>>> See:
> >>>> http://www.w3.org/egov/IG/meeting/Project_3/2010-11-19
> >>>> 
> >>>>   -- Sandro
> >>>> 
> >>>> 
> >>>> 
> >>>> 
> >>>> 
> >>> 
> >>> 
> >>> 
> >>> 
> >> 
> >> 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> 
> 


      
Received on Tuesday, 7 December 2010 22:14:24 GMT

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