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Re: PDF's usefulness to the semantic web

From: Jose M. Alonso <josema@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 18:05:43 +0200
Cc: Bobby Caudill <rcaudill@adobe.com>, eGovernment Interest Group WG <public-egov-ig@w3.org>, Kevin Novak <kevinnovak@aia.org>, Suzanne Acar <Suzanne.Acar@ic.fbi.gov>
Message-Id: <2F119E67-6D8F-400F-A212-D9891961D1D4@w3.org>
To: Dave McAllister <dmcallis@adobe.com>
Dave,

Thanks for forwarding this one. I forgot about this pointer. My bad.  
Sorry about that.
Clearly, we shouldn't reinvent the wheel. Copying Kevin and Suzanne to  
take this into consideration and a way to integrate it in the  
document. It may be also helpful to add it to the glossary (ISSUE-26)  
if they finally add one.

One minor comment though. We are touching on much more issues than the  
ones in that document and hence we need to work with a finer  
granularity when talking about Web content in some sections:  
documents, data, information... but I leave this up to the other  
(smarter) editors :)

Best,
Jose.


El 21/04/2009, a las 23:56, Dave McAllister escribió:

> I noticed that Larry Masinter’s message didn’t include the larger  
> distribution; ISSUE-18 regarding scope:
>
> Because of the similarity of purpose, the eGovernment initiative  
> should carefully consider reuse of the relevant definitions from the  
> Web Accessibility guidelines in developing government guidelines. In  
> particular:
>
> http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/
>
>
> In particular
>
> technology (Web content)
> mechanism <http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/#mechanismdef> for encoding  
> instructions to be rendered, played or executed by user agents <http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/#useragentdef 
> >
> Note 1: As used in these guidelines "Web Technology" and the word  
> "technology" (when used alone) both refer to Web Content Technologies.
>
> Note 2: Web content technologies may include markup languages, data  
> formats, or programming languages that authors may use alone or in  
> combination to create end-user experiences that range from static  
> Web pages to synchronized media presentations to dynamic Web  
> applications.
>
> Example: Some common examples of Web content technologies include  
> HTML, CSS, SVG, PNG, PDF, Flash, and JavaScript.
>
>
>
> Note that the examples of “Web content” are not restricted to “web  
> content whose format were defined by W3C alone”. It may well be that  
> W3C may restrict its technical recommendations to formats and  
> protocols within its control (i.e., not try to redefine the HTTP  
> protocol) but in policy development, a realistic policy would  
> address real-world content, as was the case with WCAG.
>
> Larry
> --
> http://larry.masinter.net
>
[rest of thread deleted]
Received on Friday, 24 April 2009 16:06:33 GMT

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