W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-digipub-ig@w3.org > October 2016

Re: Service Workers at Work...

From: Mike Perlman <perlmanm@me.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Oct 2016 08:01:37 +0200
Cc: W3C Digital Publishing IG <public-digipub-ig@w3.org>
Message-id: <ED22075D-9C27-4580-B653-6928FBA09524@me.com>
To: Ivan Herman <ivan@w3.org>
Hi Ivan

Service workers are stored in a cache.

1. On a Mac - open one of Cramer’s books in Chrome (never mind that Safari doesn’t work)
2. Reload it a few times, drink a cup of coffee.
3. In the Finder, navigate to [your user name]->Library
4. Search, for example with Moby Dick, “call me Ishmael”.
5. Notice at the bottom of the window the path to found files.
6. Navigate to that folder.
7. Open the various files in a text editor
8. Now zip up the folder and email it to the group - **oops** while you can do that, it won’t work for the recipients.

Obvious negatives you can see through this test:
1. The offline life of a service worker site is controlled by the site and the user has no idea unless they do the above steps and inspect the manifest
2. After a reboot of the computer, a service worker site appears to partially break, although this could be a coding mistake.
3. Loading https://my-service-worker-site.com when offline is a small UI step back, no?
4. Cramer’s content is minuscule in size. Let’s see how it works with, for example, your 60mb multiple video presentation.

Other points
1. From a WordPress 5DOC POV, the techniques to create a Service Worker and 5DOC are similar - the assets required for offline use can be defined once and used in both ways.
2. But what problems do service workers solve besides offering sites DRM-type control, w/o actually using DRM, and forcing users to “navigate” to the site to access the offline content, thereby attempting to “own” the user indefinitely. 

Service workers don’t really perform any useful function for users besides allowing them to turn the page when stuck on the A Train between 59th and 125th Streets.

Cheers
Mike


> On 24 Oct 2016, at 06:31, Ivan Herman <ivan@w3.org> wrote:
> 
> B.t.w., there is also a small video on
> 
> https://twitter.com/igrigorik/status/747826527295811584 <https://twitter.com/igrigorik/status/747826527295811584>
> 
> showing a way to put the 'book' on the home screen on Android. I am not an Android user, so I could not try this…
> 
> Ivan
> 
>> On 24 Oct 2016, at 06:28, Ivan Herman <ivan@w3.org <mailto:ivan@w3.org>> wrote:
>> 
>> Just for fun:
>> 
>> Last week a colleague of mine drew my attention on a nice example:
>> 
>> https://hpbn.co <https://hpbn.co/>
>> 
>> the book (which reads very nicely in a browser, with a very clean HTML structure; it is refreshing to see it), can be read online and offline. I just tried it, looked at the TOC, opened one or two chapters, then turned my WiFi off, and the whole book (including chapters that I have not seen before) could just be read. I used Opera, which, per caniuse, has SW in the browser.
>> 
>> The trick is in 
>> 
>> https://hpbn.co/assets/5e7a4451127bdccbb9346f1c8744c0d9.js <https://hpbn.co/assets/5e7a4451127bdccbb9346f1c8744c0d9.js>
>> 
>> which is linked from the documents and which does some SW magic.
>> 
>> Just a good example…
>> 
>> Ivan
>> 
>> ----
>> Ivan Herman, W3C 
>> Digital Publishing Technical Lead
>> Home: http://www.w3.org/People/Ivan/ <http://www.w3.org/People/Ivan/>
>> mobile: +31-641044153
>> ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0782-2704 <http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0782-2704>
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> ----
> Ivan Herman, W3C 
> Digital Publishing Technical Lead
> Home: http://www.w3.org/People/Ivan/ <http://www.w3.org/People/Ivan/>
> mobile: +31-641044153
> ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0782-2704 <http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0782-2704>
> 
> 
> 
> 
Received on Monday, 24 October 2016 06:02:10 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Tuesday, 25 April 2017 10:44:46 UTC