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Re: Translations in PWP?

From: Shane McCarron <shane@aptest.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 2016 10:46:07 -0600
Message-ID: <CAOk_reFMWYMEdh8DxHyfwEOQA6t0iSDAAybhn7iPT9M9m8_zcw@mail.gmail.com>
To: "Levantovsky, Vladimir" <Vladimir.Levantovsky@monotype.com>
Cc: Ivan Herman <ivan@w3.org>, Nick Ruffilo <nickruffilo@gmail.com>, W3C Digital Publishing IG <public-digipub-ig@w3.org>
Another interesting example (to us geeks, anyway).  The Annotated ANSI C is
a book where the original contents of the ANSI C (X3J11) are printed on the
left hand page, and the interpretation into English is on the facing page.
It is the only book like it I have seen, but that doesn't mean there aren't
more out there!

On Wed, Feb 10, 2016 at 10:23 AM, Levantovsky, Vladimir <
Vladimir.Levantovsky@monotype.com> wrote:

> Thank you Ivan,
>
>
>
> Another good example of practical applications of multi-lingual
> publication is what’s often used in poetry – I had a couple of books
> (“English Poetry in Translations” and “Shakespeare Sonnets in
> Translations”) where the content was presented as a side-by-side comparison
> of the original text accompanied by multiple translated versions of the
> same by different people and at different times. (And I might add that the
> translated versions were sometimes in stark contrast to the original and to
> each other, but this is hardly relevant for PWP. What is relevant though is
> that there are very practical use cases where presentation of multi-lingual
> content and the ability to toggle it side by side is needed and desired.)
>
>
>
> Thank you,
>
> Vlad
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Ivan Herman [mailto:ivan@w3.org]
> *Sent:* Wednesday, February 10, 2016 12:21 AM
> *To:* Levantovsky, Vladimir
> *Cc:* Nick Ruffilo; W3C Digital Publishing IG
> *Subject:* Re: Translations in PWP?
>
>
>
> Great example:-)
>
>
>
> But it may be a UC for a slightly different situation. I *think* Nick
> meant that you have the whole content translated and have the translations
> side-by-side within the same PWP. Your example is, in a sense, more
> interesting: it is a mixed language text, where, depending on the user's
> preferences, I may want to have the French intertwined with the Russian
> text (if I speak both languages), or only in Russian with the French parts
> being some sort of an annotation that I may call up if curious. It may
> therefore be some sort of a personalization issue use case…
>
>
>
> Ivan
>
>
>
> P.S. Actually… I remember the same issue, but I had a different setting to
> it: I read a Hungarian translation that did the same as what you say about
> the Russian: had the French portions in the text with translated footnotes.
> I was in a unique situation among my friends to understand both languages,
> ie, I could read continuously without referring to the footnotes, and it
> was a very interesting experience indeed…
>
>
>
> Interestingly, the translation I have on my bookshelf removed the French
> text altogether and is fully in Hungarian. It does take away a special feel
> to it...
>
>
>
>
>
> On 9 Feb 2016, at 22:05, Levantovsky, Vladimir <
> Vladimir.Levantovsky@monotype.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> Hi Nick,
>
>
>
> The moment I read the first paragraph of your email something from the
> distant past came to mind when “War and Peace” was on my mandatory school
> reading list. Reading the original novel (which was published exactly as
> written by the author) was a huge pain, mainly because the high class
> Russian society of that time preferred to speak French, and the book was
> written as reflection of the real life – all descriptive parts are written
> in Russian, all dialogs are in French! For those who don’t speak French, a
> paper edition of the book had half a page footnote offered by the editorial
> staff to provide the translation of the dialog – and it is repeated page
> after page after page, for all four fat volumes of the novel.
>
>
>
> So, I think we can safely consider “War and Peace” a glaring example of
> the use case, if anyone ever attempts to publish it as PWP preserving the
> original text as Leo Tolstoy intended.
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Vlad
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Nick Ruffilo [mailto:nickruffilo@gmail.com <nickruffilo@gmail.com>
> ]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, February 09, 2016 9:45 AM
> *To:* DPUB mailing list (public-digipub-ig@w3.org)
> *Subject:* Translations in PWP?
>
>
>
> Dear DPUB Group,
>
>
>
> I had one of those things where the brain feels warm - I think they call
> it a thought...
>
>
>
> Would there be a use-case for being able to have multiple translations of
> a text within a single container?  For example, if I had a copy of Tom
> Sawyer in English, French, German, etc, it could all be in one package, and
> I'd be able to toggle between them?  At least being able to go to the same
> chapter (or a given location) and switching between languages might be
> extremely useful.
>
>
>
> I imagine in STEM type stuff this might be huge - allowing for an
> educational research paper to be shared in multiple languages - or maybe
> that's a bad thing, who knows.
>
>
>
> I can imagine a bunch of really fun things one could do with such
> functionality as well (imagine a "dimension hopping sci-fi that you have to
> switch 'languages' to get to the end of the book - some translations move
> you forward, while others move you back' but that's not a use case I'd push
> as a reason for such functionality.
>
>
>
> --
>
> - Nick Ruffilo
>
> @NickRuffilo
>
> Aer.io <http://aer.io/> an *INGRAM* company
>
>
>
>
> ----
> Ivan Herman, W3C
> Digital Publishing Lead
> Home: http://www.w3.org/People/Ivan/
> mobile: +31-641044153
>
> ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0782-2704
>
>
>
>



-- 
Shane McCarron
Managing Director, Applied Testing and Technology, Inc.
Received on Wednesday, 10 February 2016 16:46:39 UTC

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