W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-csv-wg@w3.org > June 2014

Re: CSVs vs Tables

From: Yakov Shafranovich <yakov-ietf@shaftek.org>
Date: Mon, 2 Jun 2014 23:43:12 -0400
Message-ID: <CAPQd5oRrCwcNYRq5o+5ZE3bucCgOM__TxFS=QX03A3Wgi0mEAQ@mail.gmail.com>
To: Jeni Tennison <jeni@jenitennison.com>
Cc: W3C CSV on the Web Working Group <public-csv-wg@w3.org>, "rufus.pollock@okfn.org" <rufus.pollock@okfn.org>
Is there any option of allowing two "modes" like HTML, strict which
would #1, and relaxes which would be either #2, or #3?

Yakov

On Mon, Jun 2, 2014 at 3:01 PM, Jeni Tennison <jeni@jenitennison.com> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I discussed the scope of the metadata format with Rufus last week and it raised the question about what assumptions we can make about the "CSV" documents that the metadata refers to. The three options are something like:
>
> 1. We assume a 1:1 relationship between tables and CSV files (and between rows/columns/cells in the table and rows/columns/cells in the CSV file), and that the CSV files will be CSV+ (comma separated, UTF-8, no padding etc). This enables us to have a pretty simple metadata format that just includes something like:
>
>   {
>     @id: trees.csv,
>     header: true,
>     notes: {
>       #row=3: { ... }
>       #cell=4,5: { ... }
>     }
>   }
>
> The only information that the metadata might need to contain to inform the parsing of the CSV file is whether or not it contains a (single) header line. The advantages are that this is simple and it encourages people to publish well-formed CSV files. The fact that the rows/columns/cells are 1:1 in the table and CSV file makes referencing them easy using fragment identifiers. The disadvantage is that it excludes a whole bunch of "CSV" files that aren't well-formed.
>
> 2. We assume a 1:1 relationship between tables and CSV files (and between rows/columns/cells in the table and rows/columns/cells in the CSV file), but allow the "CSV" files some latitude in how they're formed (specifically, enabling different separators & escape sequences, and different encodings, but not supporting padding). The metadata format then needs to have properties that provide some information about how the file should be parsed, so something like:
>
>   {
>     @id: trees.csv
>     parsing: {
>       header: true,
>       encoding: ISO-8859-1,
>       separator: ;,
>       escape: \"
>     }
>     notes: {
>       #row=3: { ... }
>       #cell=4,5: { ... }
>     }
>   }
>
> This is still fairly simple, but we do have to specify some parsing options. The fact that the rows/columns/cells are 1:1 in the table and CSV file makes referencing them easy using fragment identifiers. It gives people more latitude in the CSV files that they publish and enables metadata to be used to describe some (but not all) legacy tabular data.
>
> 3. We don't assume a 1:1 relationship between tables and CSV files, but support the full set of parsing options that are outlined in the Tabular Model document. This means the references to both the source data file and the rows/columns/cells within it have to be done slightly differently, for example:
>
>   {
>     source: {
>       @id: trees.csv#cell=3,4-31453,19 // a region of a CSV file
>       header: true,
>       encoding: ISO-8859-1,
>       separator: ;,
>       escape: \"
>     }
>     notes: [{
>       type: row,
>       number: 3,
>       ...
>     }, {
>       type: cell,
>       row: 4,
>       column: 5,
>       ...
>     }]
>   }
>
> This is great in terms of being general purpose, but it involves more specification work and I think will be prone to confusion about the mismatch between row/column numbers in the "CSV" file vs those in the described table.
>
>
> I am in favour of #1 or #2 and not doing #3. #2 seems to meet the use cases / requirements that we've gathered so far (excepting the deferred requirement for multiple heading rows). I wanted to double check that meets everyone's expectations.
>
> Jeni
> --
> Jeni Tennison
> http://www.jenitennison.com/
>
Received on Tuesday, 3 June 2014 03:44:11 UTC

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