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[css3-transitions] [css3-animations] API for testing transitions and animations

From: Aryeh Gregor <ayg@aryeh.name>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 14:33:25 -0500
Message-ID: <CAKA+AxmW1vmS7VDGerq3i-0HUHKEXO5sgJZYWy9xNBSWga9MsQ@mail.gmail.com>
To: public-css-testsuite@w3.org
Cc: Simon Fraser <smfr@me.com>, "Edward O'Connor" <eoconnor@apple.com>, "L. David Baron" <dbaron@dbaron.org>
(Sorry if I CC'd anyone who's already on this list -- I don't know
who's subscribed.)

There are currently no tests at the W3C for transitions or animations,
and we need tests to be able to get to PR.  (Plus just to test
interop.)  It's not obvious what sort of tests we want here -- regular
JavaScript-based tests and reftests can't really test the
requirements, because setTimeout() isn't precise enough.  Both Gecko
and WebKit (maybe other engines too?) have internal testing frameworks
for transitions and animations:

http://trac.webkit.org/browser/trunk/LayoutTests/animations
http://trac.webkit.org/browser/trunk/LayoutTests/transitions
http://hg.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/file/tip/layout/style/test/test_animations.html
http://hg.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/file/tip/layout/style/test/test_transitions.html

WebKit seems to use
layoutTestController.pauseAnimationAtTimeOnElementWithId; Gecko seems
to use SpecialPowers.DOMWindowUtils.advanceTimeAndRefresh.  As a
starting point for possibly working out a format for standard
transition/animation tests, could Gecko and WebKit people perhaps give
an outline of how their internal tests work, so we could figure out if
the approach of one or the other would be suitable for standardizing?
Ideally, we'd want to be able to test both computed style and
rendering at arbitrary and reasonably precise times.
Received on Monday, 13 February 2012 19:34:14 GMT

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