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csswg/css3-images Overview.html,1.318,1.319 Overview.src.html,1.328,1.329

From: Tab Atkins Jr.. via cvs-syncmail <cvsmail@w3.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 00:57:28 +0000
To: public-css-commits@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1S2XrE-0002fT-Uy@lionel-hutz.w3.org>
Update of /sources/public/csswg/css3-images
In directory hutz:/tmp/cvs-serv10239

Modified Files:
	Overview.html Overview.src.html 
Log Message:
Link <position> to V&U properly.  Note - the link is broken until V&U gets republished.

Index: Overview.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/csswg/css3-images/Overview.html,v
retrieving revision 1.318
retrieving revision 1.319
diff -u -d -r1.318 -r1.319
--- Overview.html	29 Feb 2012 00:01:27 -0000	1.318
+++ Overview.html	29 Feb 2012 00:57:26 -0000	1.319
@@ -1269,10 +1269,9 @@
   <dl>
    <dt id=radial-position><dfn id=position>&lt;position></dfn>
 
-   <dd>Determines the center of the gradient. The
-    <!-- FIXME a href="//www.w3.org/TR/css3-values/#position"--><a
-    href="#position"><i>&lt;position></i></a><!--/a--> value type (which is
-    also used for &lsquo;<code
+   <dd>Determines the center of the gradient. The <a
+    href="http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-values/#position">&lt;position></a> value
+    type (which is also used for &lsquo;<code
     class=property>background-position</code>&rsquo;) is defined in <a
     href="#CSS3VAL" rel=biblioentry>[CSS3VAL]<!--{{!CSS3VAL}}--></a>, and is
     resolved using the center-point as the object area and the <a
@@ -2309,22 +2308,20 @@
     <tr>
      <th>Computed value:
 
-     <td>as specified, except with &lt;resolution> possibly altered by
+     <td>as specified, except with &lsquo;<a href="#resolution-type"><code
+      class=css>&lt;resolution></code></a>&rsquo; possibly altered by
       computing for &lsquo;<code class=css>snap</code>&rsquo; (see below)
   </table>
 
   <p>The &lsquo;<a href="#image-resolution0"><code
    class=property>image-resolution</code></a>&rsquo; property specifies the
-   intrinsic resolution of all raster images used in or on the element. (As
-   vector formats such as SVG do not have an intrinsic resolution, this
-   property has no effect on vector images.) This affects both content images
-   (such as in the &lt;img> element) and CSS-supplied images such as in
-   &lsquo;<code class=property>background-image</code>&rsquo;. The <dfn
+   <a href="#intrinsic-resolution"><i>intrinsic resolution</i></a> of all
+   raster images used in or on the element. It affects both content images
+   (e.g. replaced elements and generated content) and decorative images (such
+   as &lsquo;<code class=property>background-image</code>&rsquo;). The <dfn
    id=intrinsic-resolution>intrinsic resolution</dfn> of an image is used to
-   determine the image's <i>intrinsic size</i>. Affected images include
-   images in the element's content (e.g. replaced elements and/or generated
-   content), background images, list markers, etc. Values have the following
-   meanings:
+   determine the image's <a href="#intrinsic-dimensions"><i>intrinsic
+   dimensions</i></a>. Values have the following meanings:
 
   <dl>
    <dt>&lsquo;<a href="#resolution-type"><code
@@ -2350,6 +2347,9 @@
     the image's native resolution similarly adjusted.
   </dl>
 
+  <p>As vector formats such as SVG do not have an intrinsic resolution, this
+   property has no effect on vector images.
+
   <div class=example>
    <p>Printers tend to have substantially higher resolution than computer
     monitors; due to this, an image that looks fine on the screen may look
@@ -2360,10 +2360,10 @@
     appropriate size, ensuring attractive display both on screen and on
     paper:</p>
 
-   <pre class=css><code>
+   <pre>
 img.high-res {
 	image-resolution: 300dpi;
-}</code></pre>
+}</pre>
 
    <p>With this set, an image meant to be 5 inches wide at 300dpi will
     actually display as 5in wide; without this set, the image would display
@@ -2377,12 +2377,12 @@
     the image itself, falling back to 1 image pixel per CSS &lsquo;<code
     class=css>px</code>&rsquo; unit.</p>
 
-   <pre class=css>img { image-resolution: from-image }</pre>
+   <pre>img { image-resolution: from-image }</pre>
 
    <p>These rules both specify that the UA should use the image resolution
     found in the image itself, but if the image has no resolution, the
-    resolution is set to 300dpi instead of the default &lsquo;<code
-    class=css>1dppx</code>&rsquo;.</p>
+    resolution is set to &lsquo;<code class=css>300dpi</code>&rsquo; instead
+    of the default &lsquo;<code class=css>1dppx</code>&rsquo;.</p>
 
    <pre>
 img { image-resolution: from-image 300dpi }
@@ -2428,9 +2428,9 @@
   <p class=note>Note that some devices will "tag" an image with some metadata
    indicating its correct orientation, so image viewing software can do the
    necessary transformation themselves. Due to legacy compatibility
-   restraints, browsers are required to ignore this data by default. A future
-   level of this specification is expected to have a value that applies the
-   metadata-specified transformation automatically.
+   restraints, Web browsers are required to ignore this data by default. A
+   future level of this specification is expected to have a value that
+   applies the metadata-specified transformation automatically.
 
   <p class=note>Note that this property is not intended to specify layout
    transformations such as arbitrary rotation or flipping the image in the

Index: Overview.src.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/csswg/css3-images/Overview.src.html,v
retrieving revision 1.328
retrieving revision 1.329
diff -u -d -r1.328 -r1.329
--- Overview.src.html	29 Feb 2012 00:01:27 -0000	1.328
+++ Overview.src.html	29 Feb 2012 00:57:26 -0000	1.329
@@ -710,7 +710,7 @@
 	<dl>
 
 		<dt id='radial-position'><dfn id='position'>&lt;position></dfn></dt>
-		<dd>Determines the center of the gradient. The <!-- FIXME a href="//www.w3.org/TR/css3-values/#position"--><i>&lt;position></i><!--/a--> value type (which is also used for 'background-position') is defined in [[!CSS3VAL]], and is resolved using the center-point as the object area and the <i>gradient box</i> as the positioning area. If this argument is omitted, it defaults to ''center''.
+		<dd>Determines the center of the gradient. The <a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-values/#position">&lt;position></a> value type (which is also used for 'background-position') is defined in [[!CSS3VAL]], and is resolved using the center-point as the object area and the <i>gradient box</i> as the positioning area. If this argument is omitted, it defaults to ''center''.
 
 		<dt id='radial-shape'><dfn id='shape'>&lt;shape></dfn></dt>
 		<dd>Can be either ''circle'' or ''ellipse''; determines whether the
@@ -1434,11 +1434,11 @@
 				<td>visual
 			<tr>
 				<th>Computed value:
-				<td>as specified, except with &lt;resolution> possibly altered
+				<td>as specified, except with ''&lt;resolution>'' possibly altered
 				by computing for ''snap'' (see below)
 	</table>
 
-	<p>The 'image-resolution' property specifies the intrinsic resolution of all raster images used in or on the element. (As vector formats such as SVG do not have an intrinsic resolution, this property has no effect on vector images.)  This affects both content images (such as in the &lt;img> element) and CSS-supplied images such as in 'background-image'.  The <dfn>intrinsic resolution</dfn> of an image is used to determine the image's <i>intrinsic size</i>. Affected images include images in the element's content (e.g. replaced elements and/or generated content), background images, list markers, etc. Values have the following meanings:</p>
+	<p>The 'image-resolution' property specifies the <i>intrinsic resolution</i> of all raster images used in or on the element. It affects both content images (e.g. replaced elements and generated content) and decorative images (such as 'background-image').  The <dfn>intrinsic resolution</dfn> of an image is used to determine the image's <i>intrinsic dimensions</i>. Values have the following meanings:</p>
 
 	<dl>
 		<dt>''&lt;resolution>''</dt>
@@ -1458,6 +1458,8 @@
 		resolution is the image's native resolution similarly adjusted.</dd>
 	</dl>
 
+	<p>As vector formats such as SVG do not have an intrinsic resolution, this property has no effect on vector images.  </p>
+
 	<div class='example'>
 		<p>Printers tend to have substantially higher resolution than computer
 		monitors; due to this, an image that looks fine on the screen may look
@@ -1466,10 +1468,10 @@
 		image into the document and maintain an appropriate size, ensuring
 		attractive display both on screen and on paper:</p>
 
-		<pre class='css'><code>
+		<pre>
 img.high-res {
 	image-resolution: 300dpi;
-}</code></pre>
+}</pre>
 
 		<p>With this set, an image meant to be 5 inches wide at 300dpi will actually
 		display as 5in wide; without this set, the image would display as approximately 15.6in
@@ -1484,11 +1486,11 @@
 		found in the image itself, falling back to 1 image pixel per CSS
 		''px'' unit.</p>
 
-		<pre class=css>img { image-resolution: from-image }</pre>
+		<pre>img { image-resolution: from-image }</pre>
 
 		<p>These rules both specify that the UA should use the image resolution
 		found in the image itself, but if the image has no resolution, the
-		resolution is set to 300dpi instead of the default ''1dppx''.</p>
+		resolution is set to ''300dpi'' instead of the default ''1dppx''.</p>
 
 		<pre>
 img { image-resolution: from-image 300dpi }
@@ -1525,7 +1527,7 @@
 
 	<p>If a picture is taken with a camera turned on its side, or a document isn't positioned correctly within a scanner, the resultant image may be "sideways" or even upside-down.  The 'image-orientation' property provides a way to apply an "out-of-band" rotation to image source data to correctly orient an image.</p>
 
-	<p class='note'>Note that some devices will "tag" an image with some metadata indicating its correct orientation, so image viewing software can do the necessary transformation themselves.  Due to legacy compatibility restraints, browsers are required to ignore this data by default.  A future level of this specification is expected to have a value that applies the metadata-specified transformation automatically.</p>
+	<p class='note'>Note that some devices will "tag" an image with some metadata indicating its correct orientation, so image viewing software can do the necessary transformation themselves.  Due to legacy compatibility restraints, Web browsers are required to ignore this data by default.  A future level of this specification is expected to have a value that applies the metadata-specified transformation automatically.</p>
 
 	<p class="note">Note that this property is not intended to specify layout transformations such as arbitrary rotation or flipping the image in the horizontal or vertical direction. (See [[CSS3-2D-TRANSFORMS]] for a feature designed to do that.)
 	It is also not needed to correctly orient an image when printing in landscape versus portrait orientation, as that rotation is done as part of layout. (See [[CSS3PAGE]].)
Received on Wednesday, 29 February 2012 00:57:31 UTC

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