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csswg/css3-speech Overview.html,1.75,1.76 Overview.src.html,1.76,1.77

From: Daniel Weck via cvs-syncmail <cvsmail@w3.org>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2011 20:50:29 +0000
To: public-css-commits@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1Qh6O5-0003Lo-IF@lionel-hutz.w3.org>
Update of /sources/public/csswg/css3-speech
In directory hutz:/tmp/cvs-serv12684

Modified Files:
	Overview.html Overview.src.html 
Log Message:
prose cleanup


Index: Overview.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/csswg/css3-speech/Overview.html,v
retrieving revision 1.75
retrieving revision 1.76
diff -u -d -r1.75 -r1.76
--- Overview.html	13 Jul 2011 20:41:06 -0000	1.75
+++ Overview.html	13 Jul 2011 20:50:27 -0000	1.76
@@ -2163,14 +2163,6 @@
    pitch of the output). For example, the common pitch for a male voice is
    around 120Hz, whereas it is around 210Hz for a female voice.
 
-  <p> Speech-capable user agents are likely to support a specific range of
-   values rather than the full range of possible calculated numerical values
-   for frequencies. The actual values in user agents may therefore be clamped
-   to implementation-dependent minimum and maximum boundaries. For example:
-   although the 0Hz frequency can be legitimately calculated, it may be
-   clamped to a more meaningful value in the context of the speech
-   synthesizer.
-
   <p class=note> Note that the functionality provided by this property is
    related to the <a
    href="http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/#edef_prosody"><code>pitch</code>
@@ -2189,16 +2181,14 @@
      value represents an decrement, and a positive value represents an
      increment (relative to the inherited value). For example, "2kHz" is a
      positive offset (strictly equivalent to "+2kHz"), and "+2kHz absolute"
-     is an absolute frequency (strictly equivalent to "2kHz absolute").
-     Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped to zero
-     Hertz.</p>
+     is an absolute frequency (strictly equivalent to "2kHz absolute").</p>
 
    <dt> <strong>absolute</strong>
 
    <dd>
-    <p> This keyword specifies that the provided frequency is expressed as an
-     absolute, positive value. When a negative value is provided, it is
-     clamped to zero.</p>
+    <p> This keyword specifies that the provided frequency represents an
+     absolute value. If a negative frequency is specified, the computed
+     frequency will be zero.</p>
 
    <dt> <strong>&lt;semitones&gt;</strong>
 
@@ -2209,9 +2199,7 @@
      (semitones). A semitone is half of a tone (a half step) on the standard
      diatonic scale. As such, a semitone doesn't correspond to a fixed
      frequency: the ratio between two consecutive frequencies separated by
-     exactly one semitone is the twelfth root of two (approximately 1.05946).
-     Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped to zero
-     Hertz.</p>
+     exactly one semitone is the twelfth root of two (approximately 1.05946).</p>
 
    <dt> <strong>&lt;percentage&gt;</strong>
 
@@ -2223,8 +2211,7 @@
      to (from) the inherited value. For example, 50% (which is equivalent to
      +50%) with a inherited value of 200Hz results in <code>200 +
      (200*0.5)</code> = 300Hz. Conversely, -50% results in
-     <code>200-(200*0.5)</code> = 100Hz. Computed absolute frequency values
-     that are negative are clamped to zero Hertz.</p>
+     <code>200-(200*0.5)</code> = 100Hz.</p>
 
    <dt><strong>x-low</strong>, <strong>low</strong>, <strong>medium</strong>,
     <strong>high</strong>, <strong>x-high</strong>
@@ -2234,6 +2221,15 @@
      implementation and voice specific.</p>
   </dl>
 
+  <p> Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped to
+   zero Hertz. Speech-capable user agents are likely to support a specific
+   range of values rather than the full range of possible calculated
+   numerical values for frequencies. The actual values in user agents may
+   therefore be clamped to implementation-dependent minimum and maximum
+   boundaries. For example: although the 0Hz frequency can be legitimately
+   calculated, it may be clamped to a more meaningful value in the context of
+   the speech synthesizer.
+
   <div class=example>
    <p>Examples of property values:</p>
 
@@ -2308,14 +2304,6 @@
    to convey meaning and emphasis in speech. Typically, a low range produces
    a flat, monotonic voice, whereas a high range produces an animated voice.
 
-  <p> Speech-capable user agents are likely to support a specific range of
-   values rather than the full range of possible calculated numerical values
-   for frequencies. The actual values in user agents may therefore be clamped
-   to implementation-dependent minimum and maximum boundaries. For example:
-   although the 0Hz frequency can be legitimately calculated, it may be
-   clamped to a more meaningful value in the context of the speech
-   synthesizer.
-
   <p class=note> Note that the functionality provided by this property is
    related to the <a
    href="http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/#edef_prosody"><code>range</code>
@@ -2334,16 +2322,14 @@
      value represents an decrement, and a positive value represents an
      increment (relative to the inherited value). For example, "2kHz" is a
      positive offset (strictly equivalent to "+2kHz"), and "+2kHz absolute"
-     is an absolute frequency (strictly equivalent to "2kHz absolute").
-     Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped to zero
-     Hertz.</p>
+     is an absolute frequency (strictly equivalent to "2kHz absolute").</p>
 
    <dt> <strong>absolute</strong>
 
    <dd>
     <p> This keyword specifies that the provided frequency is expressed as an
-     absolute, positive value. When a negative value is provided, it is
-     clamped to zero.</p>
+     absolute, positive value. If a negative frequency is specified, the
+     computed frequency will be zero.</p>
 
    <dt> <strong>&lt;semitones&gt;</strong>
 
@@ -2355,8 +2341,7 @@
      diatonic scale. As such, a semitone doesn't correspond to a fixed
      frequency: the ratio between two consecutive frequencies separated by
      exactly one semitone is the twelfth root of two (approximately 1.05946).
-     Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped to zero
-     Hertz.</p>
+     </p>
 
    <dt> <strong>&lt;percentage&gt;</strong>
 
@@ -2368,8 +2353,7 @@
      to (from) the inherited frequency value. For example, 50% (which is
      equivalent to +50%) with a inherited value of 200Hz results in <code>200
      + (200*0.5)</code> = 300Hz. Conversely, -50% results in
-     <code>200-(200*0.5)</code> = 100Hz. Computed absolute frequency values
-     that are negative are clamped to zero Hertz.</p>
+     <code>200-(200*0.5)</code> = 100Hz.</p>
 
    <dt><strong>x-low</strong>, <strong>low</strong>, <strong>medium</strong>,
     <strong>high</strong> and <strong>x-high</strong>
@@ -2379,6 +2363,15 @@
      implementation and language-dependent.</p>
   </dl>
 
+  <p> Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped to
+   zero Hertz. Speech-capable user agents are likely to support a specific
+   range of values rather than the full range of possible calculated
+   numerical values for frequencies. The actual values in user agents may
+   therefore be clamped to implementation-dependent minimum and maximum
+   boundaries. For example: although the 0Hz frequency can be legitimately
+   calculated, it may be clamped to a more meaningful value in the context of
+   the speech synthesizer.
+
   <div class=example>
    <p>Examples of inherited values:</p>
 

Index: Overview.src.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/csswg/css3-speech/Overview.src.html,v
retrieving revision 1.76
retrieving revision 1.77
diff -u -d -r1.76 -r1.77
--- Overview.src.html	13 Jul 2011 20:41:06 -0000	1.76
+++ Overview.src.html	13 Jul 2011 20:50:27 -0000	1.77
@@ -1714,12 +1714,6 @@
       common pitch for a male voice is around 120Hz, whereas it is around 210Hz for a female
       voice.</p>
 
-    <p> Speech-capable user agents are likely to support a specific range of values rather than the
-      full range of possible calculated numerical values for frequencies. The actual values in user
-      agents may therefore be clamped to implementation-dependent minimum and maximum boundaries.
-      For example: although the 0Hz frequency can be legitimately calculated, it may be clamped to a
-      more meaningful value in the context of the speech synthesizer. </p>
-
     <p class="note"> Note that the functionality provided by this property is related to the <a
         href="http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/#edef_prosody"><code>pitch</code> attribute of
         the <code>prosody</code> element</a> from the SSML markup language [[!SSML]]. </p>
@@ -1733,15 +1727,14 @@
           is used. Otherwise (when the 'absolute' keyword is not used), a negative value represents
           an decrement, and a positive value represents an increment (relative to the inherited
           value). For example, "2kHz" is a positive offset (strictly equivalent to "+2kHz"), and
-          "+2kHz absolute" is an absolute frequency (strictly equivalent to "2kHz absolute").
-          Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped to zero Hertz. </p>
+          "+2kHz absolute" is an absolute frequency (strictly equivalent to "2kHz absolute"). </p>
       </dd>
       <dt>
         <strong>absolute</strong>
       </dt>
       <dd>
-        <p> This keyword specifies that the provided frequency is expressed as an absolute, positive
-          value. When a negative value is provided, it is clamped to zero. </p>
+        <p> This keyword specifies that the provided frequency represents an absolute value. If a
+          negative frequency is specified, the computed frequency will be zero. </p>
       </dd>
       <dt>
         <strong>&lt;semitones&gt;</strong>
@@ -1752,8 +1745,7 @@
           "st" (semitones). A semitone is half of a tone (a half step) on the standard diatonic
           scale. As such, a semitone doesn't correspond to a fixed frequency: the ratio between two
           consecutive frequencies separated by exactly one semitone is the twelfth root of two
-          (approximately 1.05946). Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped
-          to zero Hertz. </p>
+          (approximately 1.05946).</p>
       </dd>
       <dt>
         <strong>&lt;percentage&gt;</strong>
@@ -1764,8 +1756,7 @@
           Computed values are calculated by adding (or subtracting) the specified fraction of the
           inherited value, to (from) the inherited value. For example, 50% (which is equivalent to
           +50%) with a inherited value of 200Hz results in <code>200 + (200*0.5)</code> = 300Hz.
-          Conversely, -50% results in <code>200-(200*0.5)</code> = 100Hz. Computed absolute
-          frequency values that are negative are clamped to zero Hertz. </p>
+          Conversely, -50% results in <code>200-(200*0.5)</code> = 100Hz. </p>
       </dd>
       <dt><strong>x-low</strong>, <strong>low</strong>, <strong>medium</strong>,
           <strong>high</strong>, <strong>x-high</strong></dt>
@@ -1774,6 +1765,14 @@
           specific.</p>
       </dd>
     </dl>
+
+    <p> Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped to zero Hertz.
+      Speech-capable user agents are likely to support a specific range of values rather than the
+      full range of possible calculated numerical values for frequencies. The actual values in user
+      agents may therefore be clamped to implementation-dependent minimum and maximum boundaries.
+      For example: although the 0Hz frequency can be legitimately calculated, it may be clamped to a
+      more meaningful value in the context of the speech synthesizer. </p>
+
     <div class="example">
       <p>Examples of property values:</p>
       <pre>
@@ -1849,11 +1848,6 @@
       example when variations in inflection are used to convey meaning and emphasis in speech.
       Typically, a low range produces a flat, monotonic voice, whereas a high range produces an
       animated voice. </p>
-    <p> Speech-capable user agents are likely to support a specific range of values rather than the
-      full range of possible calculated numerical values for frequencies. The actual values in user
-      agents may therefore be clamped to implementation-dependent minimum and maximum boundaries.
-      For example: although the 0Hz frequency can be legitimately calculated, it may be clamped to a
-      more meaningful value in the context of the speech synthesizer. </p>
 
     <p class="note"> Note that the functionality provided by this property is related to the <a
         href="http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/#edef_prosody"><code>range</code> attribute of
@@ -1868,15 +1862,14 @@
           is used. Otherwise (when the 'absolute' keyword is not used), a negative value represents
           an decrement, and a positive value represents an increment (relative to the inherited
           value). For example, "2kHz" is a positive offset (strictly equivalent to "+2kHz"), and
-          "+2kHz absolute" is an absolute frequency (strictly equivalent to "2kHz absolute").
-          Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped to zero Hertz. </p>
+          "+2kHz absolute" is an absolute frequency (strictly equivalent to "2kHz absolute"). </p>
       </dd>
       <dt>
         <strong>absolute</strong>
       </dt>
       <dd>
         <p> This keyword specifies that the provided frequency is expressed as an absolute, positive
-          value. When a negative value is provided, it is clamped to zero. </p>
+          value. If a negative frequency is specified, the computed frequency will be zero.</p>
       </dd>
       <dt>
         <strong>&lt;semitones&gt;</strong>
@@ -1887,8 +1880,7 @@
           "st" (semitones). A semitone is half of a tone (a half step) on the standard diatonic
           scale. As such, a semitone doesn't correspond to a fixed frequency: the ratio between two
           consecutive frequencies separated by exactly one semitone is the twelfth root of two
-          (approximately 1.05946). Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped
-          to zero Hertz. </p>
+          (approximately 1.05946). </p>
       </dd>
       <dt>
         <strong>&lt;percentage&gt;</strong>
@@ -1900,8 +1892,7 @@
           inherited value, to (from) the inherited frequency value. For example, 50% (which is
           equivalent to +50%) with a inherited value of 200Hz results in <code>200 +
             (200*0.5)</code> = 300Hz. Conversely, -50% results in <code>200-(200*0.5)</code> =
-          100Hz. Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped to zero Hertz.
-        </p>
+          100Hz. </p>
       </dd>
       <dt><strong>x-low</strong>, <strong>low</strong>, <strong>medium</strong>,
           <strong>high</strong> and <strong>x-high</strong></dt>
@@ -1910,7 +1901,14 @@
           language-dependent.</p>
       </dd>
     </dl>
-    
+
+    <p> Computed absolute frequency values that are negative are clamped to zero Hertz.
+      Speech-capable user agents are likely to support a specific range of values rather than the
+      full range of possible calculated numerical values for frequencies. The actual values in user
+      agents may therefore be clamped to implementation-dependent minimum and maximum boundaries.
+      For example: although the 0Hz frequency can be legitimately calculated, it may be clamped to a
+      more meaningful value in the context of the speech synthesizer. </p>
+
     <div class="example">
       <p>Examples of inherited values:</p>
       <pre>
Received on Wednesday, 13 July 2011 20:50:31 GMT

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