W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-css-commits@w3.org > January 2011

csswg/css3-text Overview.html,1.39,1.40 Overview.src.html,1.134,1.135

From: Elika Etemad via cvs-syncmail <cvsmail@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 01:27:37 +0000
To: public-css-commits@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1Pid7h-0004Cr-Bw@lionel-hutz.w3.org>
Update of /sources/public/csswg/css3-text
In directory hutz:/tmp/cvs-serv16150

Modified Files:
	Overview.html Overview.src.html 
Log Message:
Move script group definitions to intro so they're available to other parts of the draft

Index: Overview.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/csswg/css3-text/Overview.html,v
retrieving revision 1.39
retrieving revision 1.40
diff -u -d -r1.39 -r1.40
--- Overview.html	28 Jan 2011 00:50:19 -0000	1.39
+++ Overview.html	28 Jan 2011 01:27:35 -0000	1.40
@@ -220,6 +220,10 @@
 
   <ul class=toc>
    <li><a href="#intro"><span class=secno>1. </span> Introduction</a>
+    <ul class=toc>
+     <li><a href="#script-groups"><span class=secno>1.1. </span>Script
+      Groups</a>
+    </ul>
 
    <li><a href="#conformance"><span class=secno>2. </span> Conformance</a>
     <ul class=toc>
@@ -264,8 +268,8 @@
     and Word Boundaries</a>
     <ul class=toc>
      <li><a href="#line-break"><span class=secno>5.1. </span> Line Breaking
-      Restrictions Strictness: the &lsquo;<code
-      class=property>line-break</code>&rsquo; property</a>
+      Strictness: the &lsquo;<code class=property>line-break</code>&rsquo;
+      property</a>
 
      <li><a href="#word-break"><span class=secno>5.2. </span> Word Breaking
       Rules: the &lsquo;<code class=property>word-break</code>&rsquo;
@@ -452,6 +456,51 @@
 
   <p>[document here]
 
+  <h3 id=script-groups><span class=secno>1.1. </span>Script Groups</h3>
+
+  <p>Typographic behavior varies somewhat by language, but varies drastically
+   by writing system. For convenience, CSS3 Text defines the following script
+   groups, which combine typographically-similar scripts together.
+
+  <dl>
+   <dt id=block-scripts><dfn id=block-scripts0>block scripts</dfn>
+
+   <dd>CJK (including Hangul and half-width kana) and by extension all "wide"
+    characters. (See <a href="#UAX11"
+    rel=biblioentry>[UAX11]<!--{{!UAX11}}--></a>)
+
+   <dt id=clustered-scripts><dfn id=clustered-scripts0>clustered
+    scripts</dfn>
+
+   <dd>South-East Asian scripts that have discrete units but do not use space
+    between words (such as Thai, Lao, Khmer, Myanmar). This category also
+    includes the Tibetan script.
+
+   <dt id=discrete-scripts><dfn id=discrete-scripts0>discrete scripts</dfn>
+
+   <dd>Scripts that use spaces or visible word-separating punctuation between
+    words and have discrete, unconnected (in print) units within words, such
+    as Latin, Greek, Ethiopic, Cyrillic, Hebrew.
+
+   <dt id=cursive-scripts><dfn id=cursive-scripts0>cursive scripts</dfn>
+
+   <dd>Arabic and similar cursive scripts.
+
+   <dt id=connected-scripts><dfn id=connected-scripts0>connected
+    scripts</dfn>
+
+   <dd>Devanagari, Ogham, and other scripts that use spaces between words and
+    baseline connectors within words. By extension this group also includes
+    Gurmukhi, Tamil and any other Indic scripts whose typographic behavior is
+    similar to Devanagari.
+  </dl>
+
+  <p class=issue>Provide an appendix using Unicode script names.
+
+  <p class=note>These definitions are used primarily in describing <a
+   href="#line-breaking">line-breaking</a> and <a
+   href="#text-justify">justification</a> behavior.
+
   <h2 id=conformance><span class=secno>2. </span> Conformance</h2>
 
   <p>Conformance requirements are expressed with a combination of descriptive
@@ -1155,61 +1204,10 @@
    scripts well. Additionally, some guidance should be provided on how to
    break or not break Southeast Asian in the absence of a dictionary.
 
-  <h3 id=line-break><span class=secno>5.1. </span> Line Breaking Restrictions
-   Strictness: the &lsquo;<a href="#line-break0"><code
+  <h3 id=line-break><span class=secno>5.1. </span> Line Breaking Strictness:
+   the &lsquo;<a href="#line-break0"><code
    class=property>line-break</code></a>&rsquo; property</h3>
 
-  <p>This property specifies the strictness of line-breaking rules:
-   particularly how line-breaking interacts with punctuation.
-
-  <p>CSS distinguishes between three levels of strictness in the rules for
-   implicit line breaking. The precise set of rules in effect for the
-   &lsquo;<code class=css>strict</code>&rsquo; and &lsquo;<code
-   class=css>loose</code>&rsquo; levels is up to the UA and should follow
-   language conventions. However, this specification does recommend that:
-
-  <ul>
-   <li>Following breaks be forbidden in &lsquo;<code
-    class=css>strict</code>&rsquo; line breaking and allowed in &lsquo;<code
-    class=css>normal</code>&rsquo;:
-    <ul>
-     <li>breaks before Japanese small kana
-
-     <li>breaks before the KATAKANA-HIRAGANA PROLONGED SOUND MARK (U+30FC)
-    </ul>
-    Additionally, if the language is known to be Chinese or Japanese, breaks
-    before hyphens (U+2010, U+2013, U+301C, U+30A0) may be allowed in
-    &lsquo;<code class=css>normal</code>&rsquo;.
-
-   <li>Following breaks be forbidden in &lsquo;<code
-    class=css>normal</code>&rsquo; and &lsquo;<code
-    class=css>strict</code>&rsquo; line breaking and allowed in &lsquo;<code
-    class=css>loose</code>&rsquo;:
-    <ul>
-     <li>breaks before iteration marks (U+3005, U+303B, U+309D, U+309E,
-      U+30FD, U+30FE)
-
-     <li>breaks between inseparatable characters (U+2014, U+2025, U+2026,
-      U+3033, U+3034, U+3035)
-    </ul>
-    If the language is known to be Chinese or Japanese, then additionally the
-    following breaks may be allowed in &lsquo;<code
-    class=css>loose</code>&rsquo;:
-    <ul>
-     <li>breaks before middle dots (U+003A, U+003B, U+30FB, U+FF1A, U+FF1B,
-      U+FF65)
-
-     <li>breaks before dividing punctuation marks (U+0021, U+003F, U+203C,
-      U+2047, U+2048, U+2049, U+FF01, U+FF1F)
-
-     <li>breaks before postfixes (U+0025, U+00A2, U+00B0, U+2030, U+2032,
-      U+2033, U+2103, U+FF05, U+FFE0)
-
-     <li>breaks after prefixes (U+0024, U+00A3, U+00A5, U+20AC, U+2116,
-      U+FF04, U+FFE1, U+FFE5)
-    </ul>
-  </ul>
-
   <table class=propdef>
    <tbody>
     <tr>
@@ -1253,8 +1251,9 @@
      <td>specified value
   </table>
 
-  <p>This property specifies what set of line breaking restrictions are in
-   effect within the element. Values have the following meanings:
+  <p>This property specifies the strictness of line-breaking rules applied
+   within an element: particularly how line-breaking interacts with
+   punctuation. Values have the following meanings:
 
   <dl>
    <dt><dfn id=auto title="line-break:auto"><code>auto</code></dfn>
@@ -1277,6 +1276,53 @@
    <dd>Breaks text using the most stringent set of line-breaking rules.
   </dl>
 
+  <p>CSS distinguishes between three levels of strictness in the rules for
+   implicit line breaking. The precise set of rules in effect for each level
+   is up to the UA and should follow language conventions. However, this
+   specification does recommend that:
+
+  <ul>
+   <li>Following breaks be forbidden in &lsquo;<code
+    class=css>strict</code>&rsquo; line breaking and allowed in &lsquo;<code
+    class=css>normal</code>&rsquo;:
+    <ul>
+     <li>breaks before Japanese small kana
+
+     <li>breaks before the KATAKANA-HIRAGANA PROLONGED SOUND MARK (U+30FC)
+    </ul>
+    Additionally, if the language is known to be Chinese or Japanese, breaks
+    before hyphens (U+2010, U+2013, U+301C, U+30A0) may be allowed in
+    &lsquo;<code class=css>normal</code>&rsquo;.
+
+   <li>Following breaks be forbidden in &lsquo;<code
+    class=css>normal</code>&rsquo; and &lsquo;<code
+    class=css>strict</code>&rsquo; line breaking and allowed in &lsquo;<code
+    class=css>loose</code>&rsquo;:
+    <ul>
+     <li>breaks before iteration marks (U+3005, U+303B, U+309D, U+309E,
+      U+30FD, U+30FE)
+
+     <li>breaks between inseparatable characters (U+2014, U+2025, U+2026,
+      U+3033, U+3034, U+3035)
+    </ul>
+    If the language is known to be Chinese or Japanese, then additionally the
+    following breaks may be allowed in &lsquo;<code
+    class=css>loose</code>&rsquo;:
+    <ul>
+     <li>breaks before middle dots (U+003A, U+003B, U+30FB, U+FF1A, U+FF1B,
+      U+FF65)
+
+     <li>breaks before dividing punctuation marks (U+0021, U+003F, U+203C,
+      U+2047, U+2048, U+2049, U+FF01, U+FF1F)
+
+     <li>breaks before postfixes (U+0025, U+00A2, U+00B0, U+2030, U+2032,
+      U+2033, U+2103, U+FF05, U+FFE0)
+
+     <li>breaks after prefixes (U+0024, U+00A3, U+00A5, U+20AC, U+2116,
+      U+FF04, U+FFE1, U+FFE5)
+    </ul>
+  </ul>
+
   <h3 id=word-break><span class=secno>5.2. </span> Word Breaking Rules: the
    &lsquo;<a href="#word-break0"><code
    class=property>word-break</code></a>&rsquo; property</h3>
@@ -2521,8 +2567,8 @@
      class=css>inter-ideograph</code>&rsquo; for CJK, or &lsquo;<code
      class=css>inter-word</code>&rsquo; for English. Another possibility is
      to use a justification method that is a universal compromise for all
-     scripts, e.g. the &lsquo;<code class=css>distribute</code>&rsquo; method
-     with discrete scripts dropped to second priority.</p>
+     scripts, e.g. the &lsquo;<code class=css>inter-cluster</code>&rsquo;
+     method with block scripts raised to first priority.</p>
 
    <dt><dfn id=none2 title="text-justify:none"><code>none</code></dfn>
 
@@ -2563,8 +2609,8 @@
    <dt><a name=kashida-prop></a><a name=text-kashida-space></a> <dfn
     id=kashida title="text-justify:kashida"><code>kashida</code></dfn>
 
-   <dd>Justification primarily stretches Arabic and related scripts through
-    the use of kashida or other calligraphic elongation.
+   <dd>Justification primarily stretches <a href="#cursive-scripts">cursive
+    scripts</a> through the use of kashida or other calligraphic elongation.
   </dl>
 
   <p>When justifying text, the user agent takes the remaining space between
@@ -2580,44 +2626,6 @@
    be followed when any justification method other than &lsquo;<code
    class=property>auto</code>&rsquo; is specified.
 
-  <p>Justification affects different types of writing systems in different
-   ways. For justification purposes, characters are grouped as follows:
-
-  <dl>
-   <dt id=block-scripts>block
-
-   <dd>CJK (including Hangul and half-width kana) and by extension all "wide"
-    characters. (See <a href="#UAX11"
-    rel=biblioentry>[UAX11]<!--{{!UAX11}}--></a>)
-
-   <dt id=clustered-scripts>clustered
-
-   <dd>South-East Asian scripts that have discrete units but do not use space
-    between words (such as Thai, Lao, Khmer, Myanmar). This category also
-    includes the Tibetan script.
-
-   <dt id=discrete-scripts>discrete
-
-   <dd>Scripts that use spaces or visible word-separating punctuation between
-    words and have discrete, unconnected (in print) units within words, such
-    as Latin, Greek, Ethiopic, Cyrillic, Hebrew.
-
-   <dt id=cursive-scripts>cursive
-
-   <dd>Arabic and similar cursive scripts
-
-   <dt id=connected-scripts>connected
-
-   <dd>Devanagari, Ogham, and other scripts that use spaces between words and
-    baseline connectors within words. By extension this group also includes
-    Gurmukhi, Tamil and any other Indic scripts whose typographic behavior is
-    similar to Devanagari.
-  </dl>
-
-  <p>The UA may enable or break optional ligatures or use other font features
-   such as alternate glyphs to help justify the text under any method. This
-   behavior is not defined by CSS.
-
   <p id=expansion-opportunity>CSS defines <dfn
    id=expansion-opportunities>expansion opportunities</dfn> as points where
    the justification algorithm may alter spacing within the text. These
@@ -2627,7 +2635,7 @@
    lower priority expansion opportunities are adjusted. (Expansion and
    compression limits are given by the <a
    href="#letter-spacing">letter-spacing</a> and <a
-   href="#word-spacing">word-spacing</a> properties.
+   href="#word-spacing">word-spacing</a> properties.)
 
   <p>How any remaining space is distributed once all expansion opportunities
    reach their limits is up to the UA. If the inline contents of a line
@@ -2647,8 +2655,10 @@
    are given in the table below. Space must be distributed evenly among all
    types of expansion opportunities in a given prioritization group, but may
    vary within a line due to changes in the font or letter-spacing and
-   word-spacing values. The different types of expansion opportunities are
-   defined as follows:
+   word-spacing values. Since justification behavior varies by writing
+   system, expansion opportunities are organized by <a
+   href="#script-groups">script group</a>. The different types of expansion
+   opportunities are defined as follows:
 
   <dl>
    <dt>spaces
@@ -2979,6 +2989,10 @@
   <p class=note>The &lsquo;<code class=css>auto</code>&rsquo; column defined
    above is informative.
 
+  <p>The UA may enable or break optional ligatures or use other font features
+   such as alternate glyphs to help justify the text under any method. This
+   behavior is not defined by CSS.
+
   <div class=example>
    <p>Japanese is one of the languages for which compression is preferred to
     expansion in applying justification.</p>
@@ -5957,12 +5971,27 @@
    <li>&lsquo;<code class=css>below right</code>&rsquo;, <a
     href="#below-right" title="''below right''"><strong>11.1.6.</strong></a>
 
+   <li>block scripts, <a href="#block-scripts0" title="block
+    scripts"><strong>1.1.</strong></a>
+
+   <li>clustered scripts, <a href="#clustered-scripts0" title="clustered
+    scripts"><strong>1.1.</strong></a>
+
    <li>collapsible, <a href="#collapsible"
     title=collapsible><strong>4.2.</strong></a>
 
    <li>&lsquo;<code class=css>column</code>&rsquo;, <a href="#column"
     title="''column''"><strong>6.4.</strong></a>
 
+   <li>connected scripts, <a href="#connected-scripts0" title="connected
+    scripts"><strong>1.1.</strong></a>
+
+   <li>cursive scripts, <a href="#cursive-scripts0" title="cursive
+    scripts"><strong>1.1.</strong></a>
+
+   <li>discrete scripts, <a href="#discrete-scripts0" title="discrete
+    scripts"><strong>1.1.</strong></a>
+
    <li><a href="#each-line"><code>each-line</code></a>, <a href="#each-line"
     title=each-line><strong>10.1.</strong></a>
 

Index: Overview.src.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/csswg/css3-text/Overview.src.html,v
retrieving revision 1.134
retrieving revision 1.135
diff -u -d -r1.134 -r1.135
--- Overview.src.html	28 Jan 2011 00:53:33 -0000	1.134
+++ Overview.src.html	28 Jan 2011 01:27:35 -0000	1.135
@@ -189,6 +189,41 @@
 
 <p>[document here]</p>
 
+  <h3 id="script-groups">Script Groups</h3>
+
+    <p>Typographic behavior varies somewhat by language, but varies drastically
+      by writing system. For convenience, CSS3 Text defines the following
+      script groups, which combine typographically-similar scripts together.
+
+    <dl>
+      <dt id="block-scripts"><dfn>block scripts</dfn></dt>
+        <dd>CJK (including Hangul and half-width kana) and by extension all
+          "wide" characters. (See [[!UAX11]])</dd>
+      <dt id="clustered-scripts"><dfn>clustered scripts</dfn></dt>
+        <dd>South-East Asian scripts that have discrete units but do not
+          use space between words (such as Thai, Lao, Khmer, Myanmar).
+          This category also includes the Tibetan script.</dd>
+      <dt id="discrete-scripts"><dfn>discrete scripts</dfn></dt>
+        <dd>Scripts that use spaces or visible word-separating
+          punctuation between words and have discrete,
+          unconnected (in print) units within words, such as Latin,
+          Greek, Ethiopic, Cyrillic, Hebrew.</dd>
+      <dt id="cursive-scripts"><dfn>cursive scripts</dfn></dt>
+        <dd>Arabic and similar cursive scripts.</dd>
+      <dt id="connected-scripts"><dfn>connected scripts</dfn></dt>
+        <dd>Devanagari, Ogham, and other scripts that use spaces between
+          words and baseline connectors within words.
+          By extension this group also includes Gurmukhi, Tamil and any
+          other Indic scripts whose typographic behavior is similar to
+          Devanagari.</dd>
+    </dl>
+
+    <p class="issue">Provide an appendix using Unicode script names.</p>
+
+    <p class="note">These definitions are used primarily in describing
+      <a href="#line-breaking">line-breaking</a> and
+      <a href="#text-justify">justification</a> behavior.
+
 <h2 id="conformance">
   Conformance</h2>
 
@@ -1802,8 +1837,8 @@
           appropriate value for the language, like ''inter-ideograph''
           for CJK, or ''inter-word'' for English.
           Another possibility is to use a justification method that is a
-          universal compromise for all scripts, e.g. the ''distribute'' method
-          with discrete scripts dropped to second priority.</p>
+          universal compromise for all scripts, e.g. the ''inter-cluster''
+          method with block scripts raised to first priority.</p>
         </dd>
       <dt><dfn title="text-justify:none"><code>none</code></dfn></dt>
         <dd>Justification is disabled.
@@ -1830,8 +1865,9 @@
           This value is sometimes used in e.g. Japanese.</dd>
       <dt><a name="kashida-prop"></a><a name="text-kashida-space"></a>
         <dfn title="text-justify:kashida"><code>kashida</code></dfn></dt>
-        <dd>Justification primarily stretches Arabic and related scripts
-          through the use of kashida or other calligraphic elongation.</dd>
+        <dd>Justification primarily stretches
+          <a href="#cursive-scripts">cursive scripts</a> through the use of
+          kashida or other calligraphic elongation.</dd>
     </dl>
 
     <p>When justifying text, the user agent takes the remaining space between
@@ -1845,36 +1881,6 @@
       be followed when any justification method other than 'auto' is
       specified.</p>
 
-    <p>Justification affects different types of writing systems in different ways.
-      For justification purposes, characters are grouped as follows:</p>
-
-    <dl>
-      <dt id="block-scripts">block</dt>
-        <dd>CJK (including Hangul and half-width kana) and by extension all
-          "wide" characters. (See [[!UAX11]])</dd>
-      <dt id="clustered-scripts">clustered</dt>
-        <dd>South-East Asian scripts that have discrete units but do not
-          use space between words (such as Thai, Lao, Khmer, Myanmar).
-          This category also includes the Tibetan script.</dd>
-      <dt id="discrete-scripts">discrete</dt>
-        <dd>Scripts that use spaces or visible word-separating
-          punctuation between words and have discrete,
-          unconnected (in print) units within words, such as Latin,
-          Greek, Ethiopic, Cyrillic, Hebrew.</dd>
-      <dt id="cursive-scripts">cursive</dt>
-        <dd>Arabic and similar cursive scripts</dd>
-      <dt id="connected-scripts">connected</dt>
-        <dd>Devanagari, Ogham, and other scripts that use spaces between
-          words and baseline connectors within words.
-          By extension this group also includes Gurmukhi, Tamil and any
-          other Indic scripts whose typographic behavior is similar to
-          Devanagari.</dd>
-    </dl>
-
-    <p>The UA may enable or break optional ligatures or use other font
-      features such as alternate glyphs to help justify the text under
-      any method. This behavior is not defined by CSS.</p>
-
     <p id="expansion-opportunity">CSS defines <dfn>expansion opportunities</dfn>
       as points where the justification algorithm may alter spacing within
       the text. These expansion opportunities fall into priority
@@ -1883,11 +1889,11 @@
       expanded or compressed to their limits before lower priority
       expansion opportunities are adjusted. (Expansion and compression
       limits are given by the <a href="#letter-spacing">letter-spacing</a>
-      and <a href="#word-spacing">word-spacing</a> properties.</p>
+      and <a href="#word-spacing">word-spacing</a> properties.)</p>
 
-    <p>How any remaining space is distributed once all expansion opportunities reach their
-      limits is up to the UA. If the inline contents of a line cannot be
-      stretched to the full width of the line box, then they must be
+    <p>How any remaining space is distributed once all expansion opportunities
+      reach their limits is up to the UA. If the inline contents of a line
+      cannot be stretched to the full width of the line box, then they must be
       aligned as specified by the 'text-align-last' property. (If
       'text-align-last' is ''justify'', then they must be aligned as for
       ''center'' if 'text-justify' is ''distribute'' and as ''start''
@@ -1897,8 +1903,10 @@
       are given in the table below. Space must be distributed evenly
       among all types of expansion opportunities in a given prioritization
       group, but may vary within a line due to changes in the font or
-      letter-spacing and word-spacing values.
-      The different types of expansion opportunities are defined as follows:</p>
+      letter-spacing and word-spacing values. Since justification behavior
+      varies by writing system, expansion opportunities are organized by
+      <a href="#script-groups">script group</a>. The different types of
+      expansion opportunities are defined as follows:</p>
 
     <dl>
       <dt>spaces</dt>
@@ -2149,6 +2157,10 @@
 
     <p class="note">The ''auto'' column defined above is informative.</p>
 
+    <p>The UA may enable or break optional ligatures or use other font
+      features such as alternate glyphs to help justify the text under
+      any method. This behavior is not defined by CSS.</p>
+
     <div class="example">
       <p>Japanese is one of the languages for which compression is preferred to expansion in applying justification.</p>
       <p>3.8 Line Adjustment in [[JLREQ]] gives an example of a set of rules for
Received on Friday, 28 January 2011 01:27:39 GMT

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