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RE: "Going fast on the Mobile Web" - input for MWABP?

From: 전종홍 <hollobit@etri.re.kr>
Date: Fri, 4 Jul 2008 13:24:22 +0900
Message-ID: <03F823891AF33D499971F7DDAB8EAD1701D8AE54@email2.etri.info>
To: "Dominique Hazael-Massieux" <dom@w3.org>, "public-bpwg" <public-bpwg@w3.org>
Hi, 

I think it would be also meaningful for our MWABP. 
http://developer.yahoo.com/performance/rules.html 

- Make Ajax Cacheable 
- Use GET for AJAX Requests 
- Reduce the Number of DOM Elements 
- Minimize DOM Access

Best Regards, 

-- Jonathan Jeon 

-----Original Message-----
From: public-bpwg-request@w3.org [mailto:public-bpwg-request@w3.org] On Behalf Of Dominique Hazael-Massieux
Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 5:38 PM
To: public-bpwg
Subject: "Going fast on the Mobile Web" - input for MWABP?



Hi,

I have been researching whether we should recommend using gzip-ping
content or not in the Mobile Web Application Best Practices - I'm hoping
I'll have some concrete findings to share at some point, but I'm not
quite there yet.

In the meantime, I stumbled upon this presentation from Cloud Four
called "Going Fast on the Mobile Web":
http://www.slideshare.net/grigs/going-fast-on-the-mobile-web

where, based on some of the research they made on their own, they make
the following (paraphrased) recommendations (starting slide 41):
 1. use gzip compression
 2. Fewer included resources
 3. use aggressive caching 
 4. minimize file sizes 
 5. simple and valid markup 
 6. reduce DNS lookup
 7. avoid redirects
 8. limit cookies - in particular limit them to a domain different from
static resources (so that they don't weigh down the outgoing requests)

I think we cover already 2,3,4,5, 7 in BP1 and MWABP; 1 is still being
researched (and the data they provide didn't seem that conclusive to me,
FWIW); I'm not sure how much of 6 and 8 we've covered.

They also have further recommendations for post-iPhone devices (but
without much details):
 1. optimize JS performance
 2. Reduce DOM elements
 3. Javascript at bottom of page
 4. CSS in the head tag
 5. Lazy load components
 6. Use GET unless you need POST
 7. use JSON instead of XML
 8. Use hardware accelerated effects
I think we (at least try to) cover 1 and possibly 2; not sure what
advantage 3 provides; 4 is unclear too, but if they mean "include the
style directly in the page", I seem to remember we discuss it; not sure
what 5 is about, 6 would need some caviar about the semantics of GET vs
POST, I think we cover 7, and I'm not sure what 8 is supposed to cover.

Maybe the editors will find ideas of best practices to extract from the
above?

Regards,

Dom



Received on Friday, 4 July 2008 04:25:11 GMT

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