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Looking for examples of non-REST information resources

From: Jonathan Rees <jar@creativecommons.org>
Date: Fri, 3 Dec 2010 17:31:51 -0500
Message-ID: <AANLkTi=JboxjBWp_MHJ_zmSDvYxW5CPa_b4f-EbuqQ+O@mail.gmail.com>
To: AWWSW TF <public-awwsw@w3.org>
The subject is sort of a teaser, let me be more precise.

I'm looking for examples URIs with the following properties
  - GET requests result in 200 responses
  - The URI, when used to refer (e.g. as a noun phrase in a sentence
or as a subject or object in an RDF statement), seems to refer to
something that does not naturally fit the REST mould.

By 'the REST mould' I mean what Roy F means by REST resource; my
summary would be
  - has a current state consisting of "abstract information"
  - the state may or may not change through time
  - the state can be "represented" by "representations" (bit strings +
metadata) synthesized by a server
  - the state might be updated by PUT and POST, or by some other process

My examples are

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:Random
http://www.random.org/integers/?num=10&min=1&max=6&col=1&base=10&format=plain&rnd=new

Can you name more? Are there lots of these resources?  Or only a few?
Do we need to be able to use their URIs to refer to them, or should we
refer to them in some other way, or not at all? Are 200 responses
still "representations" of these resources, or do they bear a
different relationship to the resources? Are they "information
resources"?

If it's necessary in order to formulate answers, pretend you're the
URI owner, and are entitled to make decisions about what these
resources are.

Jonathan
Received on Friday, 3 December 2010 22:32:20 GMT

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