W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-audio@w3.org > October to December 2012

Web Audio API decoder instancing

From: Bradley, Adam <adam.bradley@jagex.com>
Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2012 11:23:09 +0000
To: "'public-audio@w3.org'" <public-audio@w3.org>
Message-ID: <6DD3782C33561D44B47071B0994602640919393B27@exchange1>
Hi,

I'm interested in finding out more information on the web audio API standard with regards to decoding encoded formats (Ogg/Mp3 etc.).

What I am wondering is why the standard only allows for a 'global' decoder that accepts an intact audio stream, rather than being able to instance a decoder object and then pass the audio data to it as and when the javascript application decides in chunks.

The reason I'm interested in this is that I am wanting to get large (>10min) audio files in Ogg format playing back reliably in HTML5 whilst using as little memory as possible. It seems, at least naively to me, that this would be handled better if we could decode the files in chunks using an instanced decoder and thus employ some manner of circular buffering technique to keep the memory requirements to a minimum.

Is this something that may be possible to build into the standard, or perhaps there is another existing solution to this issue that I am overlooking?

Cheers,

Adam Bradley
Audio Systems Developer
Jagex Games Studio


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Received on Thursday, 20 December 2012 12:29:08 UTC

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