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Re: [apps-discuss] Re-review of draft-snell-http-prefer-15

From: Jan Algermissen <jan.algermissen@nordsc.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Oct 2012 23:08:10 +0200
Cc: James M Snell <jasnell@gmail.com>, Barry Leiba <barryleiba@computer.org>, HTTP Working Group <ietf-http-wg@w3.org>, Apps Discuss <apps-discuss@ietf.org>
Message-Id: <2E11857B-970B-44D6-8EB9-AF7BEFF28F50@nordsc.com>
To: Mark Nottingham <mnot@mnot.net>

On Oct 13, 2012, at 10:39 PM, Mark Nottingham wrote:

> 
> On 14/10/2012, at 6:11 AM, James M Snell <jasnell@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>>> Right, but what's the difference between:
>>> 
>>>  Prefer: wait=10
>>> and
>>>  Prefer: return-asynch, wait=10
>>> 
>>> ? "return asynch" really says "give me a 202" which is nonsense; the client doesn't control the status code, the server does.
>>> 
>> 
>> That's why it's a Prefer header and not Expect. The server retains control. "Prefer: wait=10" could just as easily result in the server simply throwing up it's hands and saying, "sorry, can't do it"
> 
> And what does return-async(h) bring to the party?

I cannot see that either. In fact, I cannot even imagine a server paying attention to the '10', given the juggling between estimating the task duration and comparing to the wait time.

Maybe

  Prefer: wait

just does the job?

Jan


> 
> The server can still throw up its hands with a 4xx or 5xx, and the client has to deal with that. 
> 
> 
> 
> --
> Mark Nottingham   http://www.mnot.net/
> 
> 
> 
> 
Received on Saturday, 13 October 2012 21:08:42 GMT

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