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Re: HTTP MIME types question

From: Voronkov Konstantin <beowinkle@mailru.com>
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 12:08:42 +0300
Message-ID: <005001c2ed2d$fc7ee100$1400a8c0@echotech.ru>
To: "Alex Rousskov" <rousskov@measurement-factory.com>
Cc: <ietf-http-wg@w3.org>

Alex, thanks for help.

My application sends binary data so I decided
 to use for POST data posting
"Content-Type: application/octet-stream"
For preventing data modifying by proxies I decided to use no-transform
directive.
For requests
 "Cache-request-directive: no-transform"
And for responses
 "Cache-response-directive: no-transform"

Best Regards,
Konstantin


----- Original Message -----
From: "Alex Rousskov" <rousskov@measurement-factory.com>
To: "Voronkov Konstantin" <beowinkle@mailru.com>
Cc: <ietf-http-wg@w3.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 13, 2003 7:07 PM
Subject: Re: HTTP MIME types question


> On Thu, 13 Mar 2003, Voronkov Konstantin wrote:
>
> > I have a question about HTTP MIME types. Our company created
> > application which uses HTTP protocol for communications. What is the
> > best MIME type to use?
>
> Depends on the kind of content your application is transmitting as
> HTTP payload. Usually, one of the registered MIME types fits well
> enough. If not, you can use (and register) your own type. Here is what
> Section 3.7 of RFC 2616 has to say:
>
>    Media-type values are registered with the Internet Assigned Number
>    Authority (IANA [19]). The media type registration process is
>    outlined in RFC 1590 [17]. Use of non-registered media types is
>    discouraged.
>
> You may want to read Section 14.17 of the same RFC as well.
>
> > Can any proxy change content (e.g. for security reasons) if I use no
> > HTTP MIME type?
>
> Some proxies might. Proxies are known to guess content type by URL
> extensions and other methods.
>
> > Some of proxy servers can try to cut banners, remove sounds and so
> > on. How can I avoid this?
>
> There may be several ways, depending on your environment.  What are
> you sending (HTML, text, opaque bytes)? Who is the client (browser,
> custom plugin, applet)? Do you control your clients? In general, using
> the no-transform cache-control directive may be a good start (see
> section 14.9.5 No-Transform Directive).
>
> HTH,
>
> Alex.
>
> --
>                             | HTTP performance - Web Polygraph benchmark
> www.measurement-factory.com | HTTP compliance+ - Co-Advisor test suite
>                             | all of the above - PolyBox appliance
>
>
Received on Tuesday, 18 March 2003 07:03:41 GMT

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