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RE: URLLEN: consensus

From: Paul Leach <paulle@microsoft.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Apr 1996 09:42:37 -0800
Message-Id: <c=US%a=_%p=msft%l=RED-77-MSG-960401174237Z-2458@red-05-imc.itg.microsoft.com>
To: "'David W. Morris'" <dwm@shell.portal.com>, 'Jim Gettys' <jg@w3.org>
Cc: "'http-wg%cuckoo.hpl.hp.com@hplb.hpl.hp.com'" <http-wg%cuckoo.hpl.hp.com@hplb.hpl.hp.com>
Ooops.  I wasn't aware of conflicting changes to this section. I only
really intended to add the last paragraph, with the rest for context,
not claim the last word on the whole section.

Jim -- please just take the added paragraph.

Thanks,
Paul

>----------
>From: 	David W. Morris[SMTP:dwm@shell.portal.com]
>Sent: 	Sunday, March 31, 1996 9:54 PM
>To: 	Paul Leach
>Cc: 	'http-wg%cuckoo.hpl.hp.com@hplb.hpl.hp.com'
>Subject: 	Re: URLLEN: consensus
>
>
>
>On Sun, 31 Mar 1996, Paul Leach wrote:
>
>> This is a replacement for section 3.2.1 on the syntax of URUs. It adds a
>> paragraph to clarify the issue of URL length. (Changes are marked with
>> change bars.)
>> 
>> This issue was discussed on the list, and this is believed to represent
>> the consensus on this issue. If you believe otherwise, please let me
>> know; otherwise, this issue will be closed.
>
>The "+" is incorrect ... it is reserved in 1.0 (see JG's latest diff)
>and must be either reserved or unsafe.  It isn't 'safe'. Of the three
>who last debated this point on the list it was two for reserved and one
>(me) for unsafe.
>
>
>> -------------------------
>> 
>> 3.2.1 General Syntax
>> 
>>    URIs in HTTP can be represented in absolute form or relative to 
>>    some known base URI [11], depending upon the context of their use. 
>>    The two forms are differentiated by the fact that absolute URIs 
>>    always begin with a scheme name followed by a colon.
>> 
>>        URI            = ( absoluteURI | relativeURI ) [ "#" fragment ]
>> 
>>        absoluteURI    = scheme ":" *( uchar | reserved )
>> 
>>        relativeURI    = net_path | abs_path | rel_path
>> 
>>        net_path       = "//" net_loc [ abs_path ]
>>        abs_path       = "/" rel_path
>>        rel_path       = [ path ] [ ";" params ] [ "?" query ]
>> 
>>        path           = fsegment *( "/" segment )
>>        fsegment       = 1*pchar
>>        segment        = *pchar
>> 
>>        params         = param *( ";" param )
>>        param          = *( pchar | "/" )
>> 
>>        scheme         = 1*( ALPHA | DIGIT | "+" | "-" | "." )
>>        net_loc        = *( pchar | ";" | "?" )
>>        query          = *( uchar | reserved )
>>        fragment       = *( uchar | reserved )
>> 
>>        pchar          = uchar | ":" | "@" | "&" | "="
>>        uchar          = unreserved | escape
>>        unreserved     = ALPHA | DIGIT | safe | extra | national
>> 
>>        escape         = "%" HEX HEX
>>        reserved       = ";" | "/" | "?" | ":" | "@" | "&" | "="
>>        extra          = "!" | "*" | "'" | "(" | ")" | ","
>>        safe           = "$" | "-" | "_" | "." | "+"
>>        unsafe         = CTL | SP | <"> | "#" | "%" | "<" | ">"
>>        national       = <any OCTET excluding ALPHA, DIGIT,
>>                         reserved, extra, safe, and unsafe>
>> 
>>    For definitive information on URL syntax and semantics, see RFC 
>>    1738 [4] and RFC 1808 [11]. The BNF above includes national 
>>    characters not allowed in valid URLs as specified by RFC 1738, 
>>    since HTTP servers are not restricted in the set of unreserved 
>>    characters allowed to represent the rel_path part of addresses, and 
>>    HTTP proxies may receive requests for URIs not defined by RFC 1738.
>> 
>> |   The HTTP protocol does not place any a-priori limit on the length of
>> a URI.
>> |   Servers MUST be able to handle the URI of any resource they serve,
>> |   and SHOULD be able to handle URIs of unbounded length if they
>> provide
>> |   GET-based forms that could generate such URIs. A server SHOULD
>> return
>> |   a status code of 
>> |	414 Request-URI Too Large
>> |   if a URI is longer than the server can handle.
>> |	
>> |	Note:
>> |	   Servers should be cautious about depending on URI lengths above
>> |  	   255 bytes, because some older client or proxy implementations may
>> |	   not properly support these.
>> |
>> |   All client and proxy implementations MUST be able to handle a URI
>> |   of any finite length. 
>> 
>> 
>> ----------------------------------------------------
>> Paul J. Leach            Email: paulle@microsoft.com
>> Microsoft                Phone: 1-206-882-8080
>> 1 Microsoft Way          Fax:   1-206-936-7329
>> Redmond, WA 98052
>> 
>> 
>
Received on Monday, 1 April 1996 09:54:21 EST

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