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Re: Globalizing URIs

From: Gavin Nicol <gtn@ebt.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Aug 1995 10:44:31 -0400
Message-Id: <199508031444.KAA06933@ebt-inc.ebt.com>
To: masinter@parc.xerox.com
Cc: glenn@stonehand.com, html-wg@oclc.org, http-wg%cuckoo.hpl.hp.com@hplb.hpl.hp.com
>How the http server for www.jacme.co.jp decides to translate strings
>into files in its local file system is COMPLETELY up to the

True.

>The URL standard makes no claims about the mapping of URLs to anything
>at all in the local file system of the local operating system. It
>defines how URLs are written, and how URLs are translated into
>sequences of octets that are sent in the protocol for the particular
>scheme chosen.
 
True.

>    http://www.jacme.co.jp/[EUC]%B0%F5%BA%FE.html
> 
>This convention requires no changes to the HTTP or URL standards.

Well, this is where we disagree. I think there should be a *standard*
way to send this information, so as such, the *standard* does require
changing. I don't mind where the information is put, but one reason
for preferring:

     http:[EUC]//www.jacme.co.jp/%B0%F5%BA%FE.html

over

     http://www.jacme.co.jp/[EUC]%B0%F5%BA%FE.html

is that the latter could very will be a legal name within the system,
leading to ambiguity. In other words, the information about coded
character set and encoding must be separated from the name itself,
because *any* representation of the information could be legal in the
context of a name (as you mention, anything is legal here).
Received on Thursday, 3 August 1995 07:48:11 EDT

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