W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > http-caching-historical@w3.org > February 1996

Re: Ordered 'opqque' validators

From: Luigi Rizzo <luigi@labinfo.iet.unipi.it>
Date: Tue, 6 Feb 1996 21:04:48 +0100 (MET)
Message-Id: <199602062004.VAA24460@labinfo.iet.unipi.it>
To: pjc@trusted.com (Peter J Churchyard)
Cc: fielding@avron.ICS.UCI.EDU, sjk@amazon.com, http-caching@pa.dec.com
> Is anybody planning to do any modelling of these protocols?
> 
> As I understand it, millions of http clients and servers may be
> expected to implement a protocol thats designed to be used in a
> continental mega cache  - continental mega cache  situation. Wouldn't this
> rather special situation better be handled by a specific protocol for that
> environment?

you raise an interesting point.

Another thing I would really like to know, to what extent we can
expect hierarchical caching to be effective ?

We know that there are some very popular servers on the internet,
so that caching traffic to these servers might look effective. But
the objects are single files/documents. What percentage of the
millions of files of these servers gets really accessed let's say
10 or more times (within a reasonable time frame, say 1 week .. 1
month), so that caching really turns out to be a significant saving ?

And, especially, how many of these files get accessed just once,
so that no caching policy is going to help ? I suspect getting
these info from some very large server would really help in
determining what we could expect from our cache, the depth of the
hierarchy, etc.

	Luigi
====================================================================
Luigi Rizzo                     Dip. di Ingegneria dell'Informazione
email: luigi@iet.unipi.it       Universita' di Pisa
tel: +39-50-568533              via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 PISA (Italy)
fax: +39-50-568522              http://www.iet.unipi.it/~luigi/
====================================================================
Received on Tuesday, 6 February 1996 20:29:58 UTC

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